Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphySenate tees up Yemen vote for Tuesday Congress moving to end US involvement in Yemen This week: Congress races to prevent third shutdown MORE finally gave up control of the Senate floor early Thursday morning, just shy of 15 hours after Democrats started their filibuster to protest Congress’ inaction on gun control. 

"I've been so angry that this Congress has mustered absolutely no response to mass shooting after mass shooting," Murphy said, ending his marathon floor session. "This exercise over the course of the last 14 hours has been in many ways a plea for this body to come together to find answers." 

The Connecticut Democrat took to the Senate floor around 11:20 a.m., pledging to “stand on this floor and talk ... for, frankly, as long as I can.” 

Though Murphy said he wanted a deal on strengthening background checks and blocking suspected terrorists from buying a guns or explosive — and suggested one was possible — it’s unclear if the move pushed the Senate closer to passing a bipartisan compromise.

Instead, Murphy indicated that there is an "understanding" to allow for votes on two Democratic proposals but acknowledged "there's no guarantee that those amendments pass." 

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynTrump adds to legal team after attacks on Mueller Senate tees up Yemen vote for Tuesday Senate GOP: Legislation to protect Mueller not needed MORE (R-Texas) said he is still trying to work with Democrats to see if the two parties could find an agreement on suspected terrorists buying guns but said he's skeptical of Democrats' intentions.

"We're trying to find out ... whether this is an effort to find a solution and common ground or whether this is just an effort to try to embarrass people," the Senate's No. 2 Republican told The Hill Wednesday evening. "I haven't yet concluded which one it is." 

Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidTrump presses GOP to change Senate rules Only thing Defense’s UFO probe proves is power of political favors Nevada Democrat accused of sexual harassment reconsiders retirement: report MORE (D-Nev.) shot down talk of an agreement Wednesday night, calling talk of "so-called negotiations ... little more than a smokescreen." 

“We are still waiting for Republicans to find the courage to stand up to the National Rifle Association and join with Democrats to keep guns out of the hands of terror suspects," he said. 

Murphy's effort won the support of dozens of Democratic senators, including Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerConscience protections for health-care providers should be standard Pension committee must deliver on retirement promise Dem super PAC launches ad defending Donnelly on taxes MORE (N.Y.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenFix the flaw in financial self-regulation Power struggle threatens to sink bank legislation Feinstein faces new pressure from left over CIA nominee MORE (Mass.), as well as Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump adds to legal team after attacks on Mueller Press: You can’t believe a word he says Feehery: March Madness MORE, the party’s presumptive nominee, and her rival Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersSenate tees up Yemen vote for Tuesday Sanders supporters cancel Clinton protest Congress moving to end US involvement in Yemen MORE (I-Vt.). 

Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) — during an impassioned speech early Thursday morning — said it was "unacceptable" for the Senate to not take action on gun control.
"I have stood on too many street corners looking down at bodies," said Booker, the former mayor of Newark, N.J.

The Senate is currently considering the Commerce, Justice and Science appropriations bill. Though no votes were scheduled for Wednesday, Murphy’s effort blocked his colleagues from making any amendments “pending” — the first step to getting a potential vote. 

Murphy and Democrats argued against starting debate on the legislation until reaching an agreement in light of the tragedy in Orlando over the weekend.

"The CJS bill includes the Department of Justice appropriation. So we are raising this issue on a bill which has real relevance on national security and law enforcement," said Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinTrump vows tougher borders to fight opioid epidemic Clinton: 'I meant no disrespect' with Trump voter comments Lawmakers rally to defend Mueller after McCabe exit MORE (Ill.), the Senate's No. 2 Democrat. 

"The point that we're getting to is this is the beginning of an important national debate brought on by the tragedy in Orlando," he said later in the night.

Democrats’ frustration boiled over three days after the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. A gunman armed with a Sig Sauer MCX rifle and a handgun killed 49 people at an Orlando nightclub and wounded 53 more early Sunday morning.

Lawmakers repeatedly lashed out at their colleagues Wednesday for not acting despite a string of high-profile shootings in recent years.

"Mass shootings are now happening like clockwork in America," Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenFacebook faces new crisis over Cambridge Analytica data Cambridge Analytica CEO filmed talking about using bribes, sex workers in political work Cambridge Analytica 'strongly denies' mishandling Facebook users' information MORE (D-Ore.) said. "And like clockwork, this Congress does nothing about it."

Warren said if lawmakers don’t act then after the next attack lawmakers will have “blood on their hands.” 

Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillGOP Senate candidate slams McCaskill over Clinton ties Dems meddle against Illinois governor ahead of GOP primary Republicans insist tax law will help in midterms MORE (D-Mo.) questioned what “invisible hand” was stopping the Senate from getting a deal on gun control, asking, “Is everyone so afraid of the NRA?”

The marathon speech wasn't without light moments. Murphy spoke from the floor to his son Owen, who he said was sitting in the Senate gallery, apologizing for missing "pizza night." 

"I hope that you'll understand some day why we're doing this," he said. "Sometimes even if you don't get everything that you want, trying hard, trying and trying and trying to do the right thing, is ultimately just as important." 

Murphy said Democrats didn't decide to stage the talkathon until Wednesday morning, though a staffer clarified they came up with the idea Tuesday. 

Since the Orlando attack, Democrats have put a renewed focused on legislation meant to block the sale of guns to people on terrorist watchlists. 

Noting the filibuster gained wide-spread attention Wednesday, Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSenate Commerce presses Facebook, Cambridge Analytic for answers on data Overnight Tech: Facebook faces crisis over Cambridge Analytica data | Lawmakers demand answers | What to watch for next | Day one of AT&T's merger trial | Self-driving Uber car kills pedestrian Overnight Cybersecurity: Trump-linked data firm Cambridge Analytica attracts scrutiny | House passes cyber response team bill | What to know about Russian cyberattacks on energy grid MORE (D-Minn.) said "the country is watching this because people are waiting for action." 

Democrats have pledged to force a vote over a proposal from Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinCoalition presses Transportation Dept. for stricter oversight of driverless cars Saudi energy deal push sparks nuclear weapon concerns Liberals seek ouster of HHS official blocking abortions MORE (D-Calif.), but Republicans argue the measure is too broad and would negatively impact individuals not on the terrorist watchlist. 

Instead, Republicans are backing Cornyn's measure that would allow the attorney general to delay suspected terrorists from getting a gun for up to 72 hours as they try to get a court to approve blocking the sale of the firearm. 

Reid, however, said Cornyn's proposal, as well as a forthcoming bill from Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.), would "move us farther away from compromise, not closer."

Toomey's legislation would require the attorney general to create a list of "likely terrorists" that could be blocked from buying guns. The list would then be submitted to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which would review it annually and remove any Americans inadvertently included, according to a summary of the forthcoming bill from his office.