Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioThe ignored question: What does the future Republican Party look like? Graham to roll out extension of Obama immigration program Trump and Cuba: A murky future MORE (R-Fla.) joined Sen. Rand PaulRand PaulThe ignored question: What does the future Republican Party look like? Rand Paul skeptical about Romney as secretary of State Trump should propose amnesty — for unpaid ObamaCare penalties MORE's (R-Ky.) ongoing filibuster Wednesday afternoon on the Senate floor, and opened his time with a sly acknowledgment of his now infamous water bottle incident during his rebuttal to the State of the Union.

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Addressing Paul, who had been conducting the filibuster for nearly five hours, Rubio quipped that it was important to stay hydrated.

"Let me give you some free advice: Keep some water nearby," Rubio said.

While giving the Republican response to President Obama's annual address last month, Rubio became parched and grabbed for an off-screen water bottle. The awkward moment became the subject of jokes and ridicule on social media networks and liberal talk show programs.

Speaking Wednesday, Rubio went on to make reference to the winter weather hitting some of the Washington area, quipping that the ongoing filibuster effort was "great for people snowed in at home with nothing better to watch but C-SPAN." The capital city braced for what was expected to be a serious snowstorm on Wednesday, although forecast accumulation never materialized within the city limits.

Paul launched the filibuster Wednesday morning to protest the Obama Administration's refusal to absolutely rule out ever conducting a drone strike against American citizens on U.S. soil. In a letter to the Kentucky lawmaker, Attorney General Eric HolderEric H. HolderDylann Roof’s 'show trial' exhibits Justice Department at its worst Sessions AG pick missed chance to remove partisanship from Justice Commutation of unfair sentences, an issue of human rights MORE said the administration had "no intention of doing so," but believed it had constitutional authority to do so in an “extraordinary circumstance" like Pearl Harbor or the September 11 attacks.

Throughout the proceedings, a bipartisan group of senators, including Rubio, Sen. Ted CruzTed CruzLewandowski: Top Cruz aide advised Trump team before NH primary Five reasons why Donald Trump could be the 'Greatest Communicator' Victims of Nazi Art theft need Congress to HEAR MORE (R-Texas), Sen. Jerry MoranJerry MoranOvernight Tech: Bill protecting online reviews heads to Obama | New addition to FCC transition team | Record Cyber Monday Overnight Finance: Trump expected to pick Steven Mnuchin for Treasury | Budget chair up for grabs | Trump team gets deal on Carrier jobs Congress passes bill protecting online customer reviews MORE (R-Kan.), Sen. Mike LeeMike LeeWill Trump back women’s museum? Overnight Cybersecurity: Lawmakers pushing for vote to delay warrant rule changes Coons to call for voice vote to halt changes to hacking rule MORE (R-Utah), and Sen. Ron WydenRon WydenSenate passes college anti-Semitism bill Overnight Finance: Trump takes victory lap at Carrier plant | House passes 'too big to fail' revamp | Trump econ team takes shape Senate Dems: Force Cabinet nominees to release tax returns MORE (D-Ore.) have taken time to ask questions of Paul, prolonging the proceedings and giving the Kentucky lawmaker a chance to rest without yielding control of the Senate floor.

Rubio praised Paul on Wednesday, saying the Kentucky senator was performing an important constitutional duty.

"It is a constitutional obligation to ask relevant questions to public policy … if we’re not going to ask these questions, who will?" Rubio said.