Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioCongress — when considering women’s health, don’t forget about lung cancer Anti-Maduro Venezuelans not unlike anti-Castro Cubans of yore Tax reform postmortem reveals lethal dose of crony capitalism MORE (R-Fla.) joined Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulOvernight Defense: Senate confirms Haspel as CIA chief | Trump offers Kim 'protections' if he gives up nukes | Dem amendments target Trump military parade Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers target Chinese tech giants | Dems move to save top cyber post | Trump gets a new CIA chief | Ryan delays election security briefing | Twitter CEO meets lawmakers Overnight Finance: Watchdog weighs probe into handling of Cohen bank records | Immigration fight threatens farm bill | House panel rebukes Trump on ZTE | Trump raises doubts about trade deal with China MORE's (R-Ky.) ongoing filibuster Wednesday afternoon on the Senate floor, and opened his time with a sly acknowledgment of his now infamous water bottle incident during his rebuttal to the State of the Union.

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Addressing Paul, who had been conducting the filibuster for nearly five hours, Rubio quipped that it was important to stay hydrated.

"Let me give you some free advice: Keep some water nearby," Rubio said.

While giving the Republican response to President Obama's annual address last month, Rubio became parched and grabbed for an off-screen water bottle. The awkward moment became the subject of jokes and ridicule on social media networks and liberal talk show programs.

Speaking Wednesday, Rubio went on to make reference to the winter weather hitting some of the Washington area, quipping that the ongoing filibuster effort was "great for people snowed in at home with nothing better to watch but C-SPAN." The capital city braced for what was expected to be a serious snowstorm on Wednesday, although forecast accumulation never materialized within the city limits.

Paul launched the filibuster Wednesday morning to protest the Obama Administration's refusal to absolutely rule out ever conducting a drone strike against American citizens on U.S. soil. In a letter to the Kentucky lawmaker, Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderObama-linked group charts path for midterm elections Senators should be unanimous in their support of Haspel for CIA chief Warren donates 5K to anti-gerrymandering and state legislature campaigns MORE said the administration had "no intention of doing so," but believed it had constitutional authority to do so in an “extraordinary circumstance" like Pearl Harbor or the September 11 attacks.

Throughout the proceedings, a bipartisan group of senators, including Rubio, Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTen dead after shooting at Texas high school Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers target Chinese tech giants | Dems move to save top cyber post | Trump gets a new CIA chief | Ryan delays election security briefing | Twitter CEO meets lawmakers For cable commentators, the 2016 GOP primary never ended MORE (R-Texas), Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranGOP senator’s defense of Tester counters Trump attacks GOP more confident about W. Va. Senate as Blankenship fades Senators hope Trump's next VA pick will be less controversial MORE (R-Kan.), Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSenate panel advances Trump's CIA nominee Doug Jones to oppose Haspel as CIA chief This week: Trump heads to Capitol Hill MORE (R-Utah), and Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenHillicon Valley: Facebook, Google struggle to block terrorist content | Cambridge Analytica declares bankruptcy in US | Company exposed phone location data | Apple starts paying back taxes to Ireland Firm exposes cell phone location data on US customers Overnight Finance: Watchdog weighs probe into handling of Cohen bank records | Immigration fight threatens farm bill | House panel rebukes Trump on ZTE | Trump raises doubts about trade deal with China MORE (D-Ore.) have taken time to ask questions of Paul, prolonging the proceedings and giving the Kentucky lawmaker a chance to rest without yielding control of the Senate floor.

Rubio praised Paul on Wednesday, saying the Kentucky senator was performing an important constitutional duty.

"It is a constitutional obligation to ask relevant questions to public policy … if we’re not going to ask these questions, who will?" Rubio said.