Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidDems face identity crisis Heller under siege, even before healthcare Charles Koch thanks Harry Reid for helping his book sales MORE (D-Nev.) on Tuesday tried to start 50 hours of debate on the budget while the clock was ticking down on the continuing resolution (CR). But Sen. Jerry MoranJerry MoranThe Hill's Whip List: GOP undecided, 'no' votes pile up on ObamaCare repeal bill Proposal to privatize air traffic control struggles to win over critics Senate panel to reject Trump’s air traffic control plan in aviation bill MORE (R-Kan.) blocked the move, in part to try to force a vote on his amendment to the CR

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Murray, who was joined on the floor by Sens. Charles SchumerCharles SchumerSenate Dems step up protests ahead of ObamaCare repeal vote Senate Dems plan floor protest ahead of ObamaCare repeal vote Dem senator: Don't bet against McConnell on ObamaCare repeal MORE (D-N.Y.), Barbara BoxerBarbara BoxerTime is now to address infrastructure needs Tom Steyer testing waters for Calif. gubernatorial bid Another day, another dollar for retirement advice rip-offs MORE (D-Calif.) and Dick DurbinDick DurbinSenate Dems set principles for potential budget negotiation Dem senator: GOP's healthcare approach will 'devastate Medicaid' Sunday shows preview: Senate healthcare debate heats up MORE (D-Ill.), said she was confident that the American people would stand by Democrats’ plan.

“We know our budget resolution reflects the values of the American people,” Murray said. “The contrast is going to be clear and the American people will continue to stand with us as we fight for a balanced approach.”

Democrats say their budget cuts the deficit by $1.85 trillion over 10 years through an equal amount of tax revenue and spending cuts, but the GOP has said that, because it assumes the sequester will not happen, the amount of deficit reduction is closer to $700 billion.

Earlier Tuesday, Sen. John ThuneJohn ThuneGOP ObamaCare fight faces do-or-die procedural vote Four GOP senators will vote against taking up healthcare bill without changes Week ahead in tech: Lawmakers turn focus to self-driving cars MORE (R-S.D.) criticized Murray’s budget for not balancing the budget over 10 years, as the House GOP budget does.

“Their budget would never balance,” Thune said. “It begs the question, what is balanced about a budget that never balances?”

Schumer said he thought Republicans could be holding up the process because they realize that the public doesn’t support the plan proposed by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul RyanPaul RyanRyan defends CBO director amid backlash on Senate healthcare bill score Ryan attacks cable news in op-ed Ryan: This could be ‘most productive’ presidency, Congress in our lifetime MORE (R-Wis.). Ryan’s plan would cut projected spending by $5.7 trillion and reduce the top tax rate to 25 percent, while balancing the budget over 10 years.

Schumer said Ryan’s plan “ends Medicare as we know it” and eliminates tax cuts for middle class families.

“I guess if I had their budget, I’d want to put it off too,” Schumer said. “Let the people hear us debate. We’re pretty confident they’ll like our budget better.”

The budget requires 50 hours of debate and unlimited germane amendments. Reid had said he'd hoped to begin the budget process at the start of the week so lawmakers could leave for their two-week Easter/Passover recess, but now it appears senators will be have to work through the weekend to complete the budget process.