Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidBill O'Reilly: Politics helped kill Kate Steinle, Zarate just pulled the trigger Tax reform is nightmare Déjà vu for Puerto Rico Ex-Obama and Reid staffers: McConnell would pretend to be busy to avoid meeting with Obama MORE (D-Nev.) announced that the Senate would begin votes on the budget Thursday evening while it continues debating the resolution.

Reid said that starting at 8:10 p.m., there would be as many as five votes on amendments.

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He also said that more amendments would be considered at 11 a.m. Friday.

The Senate is still using up the 50 hours of required debate on the budget resolution proposed by Senate Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayDemocrats turn on Al Franken VA slashes program that helps homeless veterans obtain housing: report The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (D-Wash.).

At this point, the Senate will continue debate on the budget into Friday evening, unless time is yielded back. Then it will have a "vote-a-rama" on an unlimited number of germane amendments.

On Thursday night, the Senate will vote on amendments from Sens. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsGOP strategist donates to Alabama Democrat House passes concealed carry gun bill Rosenstein to testify before House Judiciary Committee next week MORE (R-Ala.), Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees Ryan pledges 'entitlement reform' in 2018 Utah governor calls Bannon a 'bigot' after attacks on Romney MORE (R-Utah), Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowThe Hill's 12:30 Report Avalanche of Democratic senators say Franken should resign Democrats to Trump: Ask Forest Service before shrinking monuments MORE (D-Mich.), Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGrassley blasts Democrats over unwillingness to probe Clinton GOP and Dems bitterly divided by immigration Thanks to the farm lobby, the US is stuck with a broken ethanol policy MORE (R-Iowa) and Murray.

Sessions's motion to recommit the budget to the committee would simply support balancing the budget. The Senate Democratic budget does not project a balance, and voting against the Sessions amendment, which does not say only spending cuts need to be used, could be treacherous for vulnerable Democrats.

Hatch's amendment targets a 2.3 percent medical device tax that was enacted as part of the president's healthcare law. His amendment has support from Minnesota Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharFranken resignation could upend Minnesota races Avalanche of Democratic senators say Franken should resign Trump-free Kennedy Center Honors avoids politics MORE (D) and Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenDemocrats turn on Al Franken Schumer called, met with Franken and told him to resign Overnight Finance: Trump says shutdown 'could happen' | Ryan, conservatives inch closer to spending deal | Senate approves motion to go to tax conference | Ryan promises 'entitlement reform' in 2018 MORE (D).

Stabenow's amendment would prevent Medicare from becoming a voucher program.

Grassley's amendment would require that tax revenue be used to pay down the deficit rather than pay for spending increases.

Murray's amendment would force Senate Republicans to vote for the budget proposed by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees House Republican: 'I worry about both sides' of the aisle on DACA Overnight Health Care: 3.6M signed up for ObamaCare in first month | Ryan pledges 'entitlement reform' next year | Dems push for more money to fight opioids MORE (R-Wis.), which passed the House Thursday morning on a 221-207 vote.

Ryan balances the budget over 10 years by cutting projected spending by $5.7 trillion. Democrats have criticized the plan because it would "gut" programs that benefit the middle class and turn Medicare into a voucher system.

The Democratic budget has already come under heavy fire from Republicans who say it over-estimates the extent to which it would reduce the deficit, and raises $1 trillion in new taxes. Democrats say their budget cuts the deficit by $1.85 trillion over 10 years through an equal amount of spending cuts and new revenue, but the GOP has said that because it assumes the sequester will not happen, the amount of deficit reduction is closer to $700 billion.

Under budget rules, amendments need only a majority to pass.

—This post was updated at 7:43 p.m.