Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidConservative Senate candidate calls on GOP to end filibuster Ex-Reid aide: McConnell's 'original sin' was casting ObamaCare as 'partisan, socialist takeover' GOP faces growing demographic nightmare in West MORE (D-Nev.) announced that the Senate would begin votes on the budget Thursday evening while it continues debating the resolution.

Reid said that starting at 8:10 p.m., there would be as many as five votes on amendments.

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He also said that more amendments would be considered at 11 a.m. Friday.

The Senate is still using up the 50 hours of required debate on the budget resolution proposed by Senate Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty MurrayPatty MurrayGAO looking into improper HHS healthcare tweets Live coverage: Senate begins debate on ObamaCare repeal Report: minimum wage bill would benefit 20.7 million workers in 21 states MORE (D-Wash.).

At this point, the Senate will continue debate on the budget into Friday evening, unless time is yielded back. Then it will have a "vote-a-rama" on an unlimited number of germane amendments.

On Thursday night, the Senate will vote on amendments from Sens. Jeff SessionsJeff SessionsSenate panel advances measure to protect medical marijuana states Sessions is the nicest man in town — but don't mistake that for weakness Sessions: Trump's attacks on me were 'hurtful' MORE (R-Ala.), Orrin HatchOrrin HatchRyan drops border-tax proposal as GOP unifies around principles Trump triggers storm with transgender ban Kerry on Trump’s military transgender ban: ‘We’re better than this’ MORE (R-Utah), Debbie StabenowDebbie StabenowDems at odds over direction of ‘Better Deal’ Overnight Finance: House votes to repeal arbitration rule | Yellen, Cohn on Trump's list for Fed chief | House passes Russia sanctions deal | GOP centrists push back on border wall funding Senators urge quotas on Canadian lumber, consultations with Congress MORE (D-Mich.), Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyHow do you get lower cost drugs? Give the FDA a bigger stick GOP senator warns of 'holy hell to pay' if Trump fires Sessions GOP senator warns Trump: Panel won't take up attorney general nominee this year MORE (R-Iowa) and Murray.

Sessions's motion to recommit the budget to the committee would simply support balancing the budget. The Senate Democratic budget does not project a balance, and voting against the Sessions amendment, which does not say only spending cuts need to be used, could be treacherous for vulnerable Democrats.

Hatch's amendment targets a 2.3 percent medical device tax that was enacted as part of the president's healthcare law. His amendment has support from Minnesota Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHow do you get lower cost drugs? Give the FDA a bigger stick Dems to unveil ‘better deal’ messaging campaign Monday Dem senator: Trump acting like he's still on ‘The Apprentice’ MORE (D) and Al FrankenAl FrankenOPINION | Democrats: Time to wish Hillary Clinton good luck and goodbye Franken: ‘Constitutional crisis’ if Trump uses recess appointment to replace Sessions with someone who’ll fire Mueller AT&T discussing merger conditions with DOJ: report MORE (D).

Stabenow's amendment would prevent Medicare from becoming a voucher program.

Grassley's amendment would require that tax revenue be used to pay down the deficit rather than pay for spending increases.

Murray's amendment would force Senate Republicans to vote for the budget proposed by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul RyanPaul RyanFour GOP senators threaten to block ‘skinny’ repeal GOP rep: Senate ObamaCare repeal ‘is ugly to the bone’ GOP senators: House agreeing to go to conference on ObamaCare repeal MORE (R-Wis.), which passed the House Thursday morning on a 221-207 vote.

Ryan balances the budget over 10 years by cutting projected spending by $5.7 trillion. Democrats have criticized the plan because it would "gut" programs that benefit the middle class and turn Medicare into a voucher system.

The Democratic budget has already come under heavy fire from Republicans who say it over-estimates the extent to which it would reduce the deficit, and raises $1 trillion in new taxes. Democrats say their budget cuts the deficit by $1.85 trillion over 10 years through an equal amount of spending cuts and new revenue, but the GOP has said that because it assumes the sequester will not happen, the amount of deficit reduction is closer to $700 billion.

Under budget rules, amendments need only a majority to pass.

—This post was updated at 7:43 p.m.