Murphy said he thought the public should know about these victims since there will be more unless Congress acts to prevent more gun violence. He returned to the floor several times througout the day to continue talking about vicitms.

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“I’ll be back today and tomorrow to talk about more victims,” Murphy said before leaving the floor after talking for more than an hour. “I just think we need to tell their stories. People need to know who they are because there are going to be more of them if we don’t do something.”

The Senate is considering S.649, the Safe Communities, Safe Schools Act, which would expand background checks on gun purchases, create new penalties on straw purchases and include new funding for school security. 

The bill doesn’t include an assault weapons ban or limits on magazine clip capacity — although Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidMcConnell not yet ready to change rules for Trump nominees The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by CVS Health — Trump’s love-hate relationship with the Senate Trump to press GOP on changing Senate rules MORE (D-Nev.) promised to allow a vote on those provisions as an amendment.  A procedurla motion to formally begin debate on the legislation is set for Thursday.

Murphy spoke on the floor earlier Wednesday, urging his colleagues to support the gun-control reforms being proposed.

“If we had stronger laws on the books, Newtown might not have happened today,” Murphy said.

Murphy pointed out that the gunman at Sandy Hook Elementary shot off more than 150 bullets in 10 minutes and five children were able to escape while he stopped to reload. One proposed amendment would limit ammunitions clips to 10 bullets.

“I think we would have more children alive today if we had ammunitions clips of 10,” Murphy said.

Families of the Newtown victims have been visiting the offices of senators this week urging them to support gun-control.

A group of GOP senators, lead by Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeDenial of services to same-sex couples can harm their health GOP Senate primary heats up in Montana Senate GOP urges Trump administration to work closely with Congress on NAFTA MORE (Utah), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulOvernight Energy: Reporters barred from Day 2 of EPA summit | Dems blame Trump for gas price increases | Massachusetts to get new offshore wind farm Senate Democrats look for traction on gas prices GOP Senate primary heats up in Montana MORE (Ky.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenators introduce bill to overhaul sexual harassment policy Greatest risk to the Republican majority? Rising interest rates GOP Senate primary heats up in Montana MORE (Texas), have threatened to filibuster any gun-control reforms, requiring a 60-vote threshold, because they say it would violate Second Amendment rights. They argue that the gun-control measures proposed by Democrats wouldn't have prevented the Newtown shooting.

“Seems like somewhat of a disservice is being done to these families," Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeSenate panel unanimously approves water infrastructure bill Defense bill moves forward with lawmakers thinking about McCain Overnight Energy: EPA moves to roll back chemical plant safety rule | NASA chief says humans contribute to climate change | Pruitt gets outside lawyer MORE (R-Okla.) said. "It’s almost like we’re looking at legislation that would have stopped something like this from happening. … Maybe I’m looking at it too simplistically.”

This article was updated at 2:20 p.m. and 3:50 p.m.