The Senate gun reform bill would expand background checks on gun purchases, create new penalties on straw purchases and include new funding for school security.

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The bill doesn’t include an assault weapons ban or limits on magazine clip capacity — although Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidOPINION | 5 ways Democrats can win back power in the states THE MEMO: Trump's base cheers attacks on McConnell It's time for McConnell to fight with Trump instead of against him MORE (D-Nev.) promised a vote on those provisions as an amendment.

McConnell expressed concern with Sen. Chuck SchumerCharles SchumerDemocrats urge Trump to condemn Charlottesville violence Melania Trump on Charlottesville protests: 'No good comes from violence' It's time for McConnell to fight with Trump instead of against him MORE’s (D-N.Y.) provision extending background checks. Republicans have said the bill could create a federal registry of gun owners and make it harder for family members to transfer firearms. 

“The following offenses would now be federal crimes: An uncle giving his nephew a hunting rifle for Christmas, a niece giving her aunt a handgun for protection,” McConnell said. “These people I’m describing are not criminals. ... But the Schumer bill would outlaw these transfers, and it would make people like these, criminals.”

Reid said that the first amendment considered would be a new deal on background checks from Sens. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinOPINION | 5 ways Democrats can win back power in the states Trump's Democratic tax dilemma Manchin eyed as potential pick for Energy secretary: report MORE (D-W.Va.) and Pat Toomey (R-Pa.).

Manchin and Toomey’s deal would expand background checks to cover all sales at gun shows and over the Internet. Those background checks would have to be accompanied by records proving to law enforcement officials they took place. It would exempt gun sales and transfers between friends and acquaintances, and explicitly bans the federal government from creating a national firearms registry.

Reid said he hoped that if cloture is invoked at 11 a.m. on Thursday, Republicans would immediately allow a vote on the actual motion to proceed so that senators could start legislating before the weekend.

“I’m pleased that a number of reasonable Republicans have joined Democrats to invoke cloture so we can start debate,” Reid said Thursday. “I’m hopeful we’ll be able to debate and work on reasonable amendments.”

A group of GOP senators, lead by Sens. Mike LeeMike LeeTrouble draining the swamp? Try returning power to the states Congress must act to protect data privacy before courts make surveillance even easier Five tough decisions for the GOP on healthcare MORE (Utah), Rand PaulRand PaulCurtis wins GOP primary for House seat vacated by Jason Chaffetz Glimmer of hope in bipartisan criminal justice reform effort Trump barrage stuns McConnell and his allies MORE (Ky.) and Ted CruzTed CruzThe media couldn't be more blatant in distorting Trump's words on Charlottesville Curtis wins GOP primary for House seat vacated by Jason Chaffetz Kimmel: Let’s make Trump a king so he has no power MORE (Texas), have threatened to filibuster any gun control reforms, requiring a 60-vote threshold, because they say it would violate Second Amendment rights.