The Senate gun reform bill would expand background checks on gun purchases, create new penalties on straw purchases and include new funding for school security.

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The bill doesn’t include an assault weapons ban or limits on magazine clip capacity — although Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidTo end sugar subsidies, conservatives can't launch a frontal attack House presses Senate GOP on filibuster reform A pro-science approach to Yucca Mountain appropriations MORE (D-Nev.) promised a vote on those provisions as an amendment.

McConnell expressed concern with Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerGOP lawmaker: Dems not standing for Trump is 'un-American' Trump called for unity — he didn’t even last a week Overnight Defense: GOP plays hardball by attaching defense funding to CR | US reportedly drawing down in Iraq | Russia, US meet arms treaty deadline | Why the military wants 6B from Congress MORE’s (D-N.Y.) provision extending background checks. Republicans have said the bill could create a federal registry of gun owners and make it harder for family members to transfer firearms. 

“The following offenses would now be federal crimes: An uncle giving his nephew a hunting rifle for Christmas, a niece giving her aunt a handgun for protection,” McConnell said. “These people I’m describing are not criminals. ... But the Schumer bill would outlaw these transfers, and it would make people like these, criminals.”

Reid said that the first amendment considered would be a new deal on background checks from Sens. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinMcConnell: 'Whoever gets to 60 wins' on immigration Manchin: Senators should sign pledge not to campaign against each other  GOP senators turning Trump immigration framework into legislation MORE (D-W.Va.) and Pat Toomey (R-Pa.).

Manchin and Toomey’s deal would expand background checks to cover all sales at gun shows and over the Internet. Those background checks would have to be accompanied by records proving to law enforcement officials they took place. It would exempt gun sales and transfers between friends and acquaintances, and explicitly bans the federal government from creating a national firearms registry.

Reid said he hoped that if cloture is invoked at 11 a.m. on Thursday, Republicans would immediately allow a vote on the actual motion to proceed so that senators could start legislating before the weekend.

“I’m pleased that a number of reasonable Republicans have joined Democrats to invoke cloture so we can start debate,” Reid said Thursday. “I’m hopeful we’ll be able to debate and work on reasonable amendments.”

A group of GOP senators, lead by Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeRubio on push for paid family leave: ‘We still have to work on members of my own party’ National ad campaign pushes Congress to pass legislation lowering drug prices Senate Republicans call on Trump to preserve NAFTA MORE (Utah), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulPentagon: War in Afghanistan will cost billion in 2018 Overnight Finance: Senators near two-year budget deal | Trump would 'love to see a shutdown' over immigration | Dow closes nearly 600 points higher after volatile day | Trade deficit at highest level since 2008 | Pawlenty leaving Wall Street group Rand Paul calls for punishment if Congress can't reach a long-term budget deal MORE (Ky.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSasse statement: Trump nominee who spread conspiracy theories has a ‘tinfoil hat’ Coalition of 44 groups calls for passage of drug pricing bill For the sake of our democracy, politicians must stop bickering MORE (Texas), have threatened to filibuster any gun control reforms, requiring a 60-vote threshold, because they say it would violate Second Amendment rights.