Manchin and Toomey’s deal would expand background checks to cover all sales at gun shows and over the Internet. Those background checks would have to be accompanied by records proving to law enforcement officials they took place. It would exempt gun sales and transfers between friends and acquaintances, and explicitly ban the federal government from creating a national firearms registry.

ADVERTISEMENT
The Senate is debating S.649, the Safe Communities, Safe Schools Act, which would expand background checks on gun purchases, crack down on gun trafficking and beef up security in schools. GOP senators have vowed to block that bill, claiming it goes too far and infringes on the rights of gun owners.

The bill doesn’t include an assault weapons ban or limits on magazine clip capacity — although Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidThis obscure Senate rule could let VP Mike Pence fully repeal ObamaCare once and for all Sharron Angle to challenge GOP rep in Nevada Fox's Watters asks Trump whom he would fire: Baldwin, Schumer or Zucker MORE (D-Nev.) promised Wednesday votes on those provisions as amendments from Sens. Dianne FeinsteinDianne FeinsteinLive coverage: Day three of Supreme Court nominee hearing Dems land few punches on Gorsuch Live coverage: Day two of Supreme Court nominee hearing MORE (D-Calif.), Richard BlumenthalRichard BlumenthalDem senators reintroduce cybersecurity bills for cars, planes Trump: 'I'll criticize judges,' even though 'somebody said I should not' Spicer: 'Wrong and misleading' to say Gorsuch called Trump's attacks on judges 'disheartening' MORE (D-Conn.) and Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.).

Reid also set up amendment votes on the following amendments for Wednesday: Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyLive coverage: Day three of Supreme Court nominee hearing Live coverage: Day two of Supreme Court nominee hearing Grassley, CNN host spar over Trump wiretap claims MORE’s (R-Iowa) GOP substitute amendment; Sens. Patrick LeahyPatrick LeahyLive coverage: Day three of Supreme Court nominee hearing Dems land few punches on Gorsuch Live coverage: Day two of Supreme Court nominee hearing MORE (D-Vt.) and Susan CollinsSusan CollinsFive takeaways from Labor pick’s confirmation hearing ObamaCare repeal faces last obstacle before House vote Repeal of Obama drilling rule stalls in the Senate MORE's (R-Maine) amendment on gun trafficking; Sen. John CornynJohn CornynGOP senator: 'We still need to figure out what the president was talking about' on wiretapping Live coverage: Day two of Supreme Court nominee hearing Repeal of Obama drilling rule stalls in the Senate MORE’s (R-Texas) amendment on conceal and carry rules; Sen. Richard BurrRichard BurrSchumer: Trump must apologize for wiretapping claim Senate panel asks Trump ally Roger Stone to preserve Russia-related records Senate Intel Committee sets hearing on Russian election interference MORE’s (R-N.C.) amendment protecting gun rights of veterans; Sen. John BarrassoJohn BarrassoOvernight Energy: Ethanol groups prep for fight over mandate Trump’s nominee to lead FDA could make drug prices low again Top Senate Republicans ding CBO amid concerns over ObamaCare repeal MORE’s (R-Wyo.) amendment on privacy of gun owners; and a mental health amendment from Sens. Tom HarkinTom HarkinGrassley challenger no stranger to defying odds Clinton ally stands between Sanders and chairmanship dream Do candidates care about our health or just how much it costs? MORE (D-Iowa) and Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderTrump's Labor pick signals support for overtime pay hike Week ahead: Labor, SEC nominees head before Senate It’s time for the government to stop preventing smokers from quitting MORE (R-Tenn.).

All of those amendments will be held to a 60-vote threshold. Reid has promised an open amendment process, so several more amendments could receive votes if additional agreements are reached.

Democrats have been pushing for stricter gun laws since December, when a gunman killed 20 first-graders and six school employees at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.

“In these final hours, we're engaged in a full court press on both sides of the aisle for a bipartisan compromise," Blumenthal said after the amendment agreement was announced. "These votes afford an opportunity to keep faith with the families of Newtown, and 3,400 victims of gun violence since that unspeakable tragedy. Just as the world has watched Newtown since December 14, Newtown will be watching the U.S. Senate tomorrow."

This article was updated at 8:50 p.m. to include Sen. Blumenthal's statement.