The Senate voted 74-20 on Monday to end debate on proceeding to a bill that would allow states to collect online sales tax.

The Marketplace Fairness Act, S. 743, would empower states to collect taxes on purchases made online by consumers in their states. 

The strong vote to end debate suggests supporters of the bill are likely to see it win approval in the Senate this week. Its path through the House, despite the support of many GOP governors, is less clear.

Senators in states without a sales tax voiced opposition to the bill Monday, arguing it would burden retailers in their states by forcing them to collect taxes for other state governments.

“I strongly oppose this measure because it would put a serious burden on small businesses that rely on the Internet to tap into growing markets, expand their operations, and create jobs,” Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenDems demand Tillerson end State hiring freeze, consult with Congress The Hill Interview: GOP chairman says ‘red flags’ surround Russian cyber firm Schumer celebrates New York Giants firing head coach: ‘About time’ MORE (D-N.H.) said Monday. “Mandating that small businesses collect sales taxes for an additional 46 states and 9,600 tax jurisdictions would overload these entities with bureaucracy and red tape.”

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The bill would exempt small businesses that earn less than $1 million annually from out-of-state sales. 

Under current law, states can only collect sales taxes from retailers that have a physical presence in their state. People who order items online from another state are supposed to declare the purchases on their tax forms, but few do or are even aware of the law.

“It’s only fair to the businesses across America, if they are required to collect sales tax on their sales, that those competing with them ought to do the same,” Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDemocrats turn on Al Franken Minnesota's largest newspaper calls on Franken to resign Democratic senator predicts Franken will resign Thursday MORE (D-Ill.) said ahead of the vote Monday. Durbin is a leading co-sponsor of the bill.

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBooker tries to find the right lane  Top Lobbyists 2017: Hired Guns GOP tries to keep spotlight on taxes amid Mueller charges MORE (D-Mont.) said the bill should have gone through committee before coming to the Senate floor, but last week Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidBill O'Reilly: Politics helped kill Kate Steinle, Zarate just pulled the trigger Tax reform is nightmare Déjà vu for Puerto Rico Ex-Obama and Reid staffers: McConnell would pretend to be busy to avoid meeting with Obama MORE (D-Nev.) decided to call up the bill anyway.

“This bill is not ready for debate on the Senate floor,” Baucus said. “It forces our small businesses to be tax collectors for other states.

“And who is policing all of this? The bill as written today, has no audit or enforcement protection.”

Those supporting the bill have called it a “states’ rights bill” because it would allow states — many of which are battling large budget deficits — to collect the revenue they need to fund state programs.

“Right now, it’s not only unfair to small businesses, but it’s costing states and localities millions in tax revenue,” said Sen. Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees Live coverage: Senate Republicans pass tax bill The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill MORE (R-Wyo.), the lead sponsor of the bill.

The Senate last month passed a non-binding budget resolution on a 75-24 vote supporting the Marketplace Fairness language. That strong bipartisan vote showed there is enough support to pass the bill. 

Most opposition to the bill has come from conservative GOP members joined by lawmakers from three states that don’t have sales tax: Montana, New Hampshire and Oregon. Delaware also doesn’t have a sales tax, but their senators didn’t oppose the bill.

Retail groups such as the National Retail Federation and the Retail Industry Leaders Association have backed the legislation, which senators have been pushing for years.

Reps. Steve WomackStephen (Steve) Allen WomackGOP budget chair may not finish her term Jockeying begins in race for House Budget gavel Trump reopens fight on internet sales tax MORE (R-Ark.), Jackie Speier (D-Calif.), Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchTrump talks tough but little action seen on drug prices Frustrated with Trump, Dems introduce drug pricing bill Lawmakers try again on miners’ pension bill MORE (D-Vt.) and John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) have introduced companion legislation in the House.