Senate to vote on 9/11 veto override Wednesday
© Greg Nash

The Senate is moving forward with a pledge by leadership to try to override President Obama's veto of legislation that would allow families of 9/11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia in court.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellSenate healthcare bill appears headed for failure Talk of Trump pardons reverberates on Sunday shows Trump backers eye GOP primary challenges for Flake, Heller MORE (R-Ky.) set the vote on overriding the veto, along with two hours of debate, for Wednesday.

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The showdown could end with lawmakers nixing the president's veto for the first time in his administration.

Obama followed through on a pledge to veto the bill, known as the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act (JASTA), on Friday. The White House argues the legislation would undermine "sovereign immunity" and the U.S.-Saudi relationship, as well as open up U.S. citizens to retaliatory measures.

The legislation passed both the House and Senate unanimously earlier this year, pitting Obama against congressional Democrats. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonTrump Jr. adds to legal team ahead of Senate meeting Trump: Democrats, Russians laughing at 'phony Russian Witch Hunt' Scaramucci makes Sunday shows debut with vow to stop WH leaks MORE and Donald TrumpDonald TrumpScarborough, Brzezinski named rabbit after Trump Trump Jr. adds to legal team ahead of Senate meeting Conway: Trump doesn't think he's lying on voter fraud, wiretap claims MORE, the GOP nominee, both support the bill.

A GOP leadership aide said the House will likely also vote to override the veto before the chamber adjourns this week.

Senate leadership quickly voiced confidence after the veto that they would have the two-thirds supermajority necessary to override it. If they succeed, the House must also vote to reject the veto.

New York Sen. Charles Schumer, expected to be the next Democratic leader, joined Republicans Friday in criticizing Obama's move.

“This is a disappointing decision that will be swiftly and soundly overturned in Congress," Schumer said in a statement. "I believe both parties will come together next week to make JASTA the law of the land."

Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) — who spearheaded the bill along with Schumer — said the veto and the president's "refusal to listen to the families of the victims taken from us on September 11th" is "disappointing."

“I look forward to the opportunity for Congress to override the President’s veto, provide these families with the chance to seek the justice they deserve, and send a clear message that we will not tolerate those who finance terrorism in the United States," the Senate's No. 2 Republican said in a statement.

—Cristina Marcos contributed.