Sen. Mike LeeMike LeeWhy is the State Department refusing to disclose Soros' involvement in Macedonia? What to know about Trump's national monuments executive order ObamaCare must be fixed before it collapses MORE (R-Utah) called on Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidDraft House bill ignites new Yucca Mountain fight Week ahead: House to revive Yucca Mountain fight Warren builds her brand with 2020 down the road MORE (D-Nev.) to apologize for calling Sen. Ted CruzTed CruzTrump in campaign mode at NRA convention Trump’s hands are tied on 9th Circuit Schumer: Trump's handling of North Korea 'all wrong' MORE (R-Texas) a "schoolyard bully."

“When you accuse a colleagues of being a schoolyard bully, you certainly don’t mean it as a compliment,” Lee said Tuesday evening. “Sometimes in a moment of weakness we say things that we meant to say, but shouldn’t have. If in fact the Majority Leader slipped and said something he didn’t mean to say … then I invite him to come forward and I’m confident that my friend the junior senator from Texas will promptly and frankly accept his apology.

"Sometimes people say things that they regret but that's what apologies are for."

Lee said that insult violated part two of Senate Rule 19.

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Shortly before Lee's remarks, Cruz thanked Reid for his “candor."

On Monday, Cruz objected to Reid asking for unanimous consent to form a conference committee on the House and Senate budgets. Cruz said he would allow the agreement if the conference report was prohibited from including tax increases or raised the debt ceiling. Cruz said he wanted that guarantee because the conference report could be passed through reconciliation — requiring just a simple majority.

“The Majority Leader could have claimed that he had no intention to undermine the protections of the minority … but in a refreshing display of candor, he did not do so,” Cruz said Tuesday. “Let me be explicit — we had no objection to proceeding to conference if the leader is willing to not use it as a backdoor to raise the debt ceiling.”

Cruz said that Reid called him a bully because he was simply pointing out that the Reid was trying to circumvent minority objections.

“For reasons unknown, the majority leader deemed my saying so out loud as some how bullying,” Cruz said. “Shining light on our substantive disagreements is not bullying. … All of us should exercise candor.”

Reid said because Cruz was on the losing side of the budget debate, he wanted to hold up the process and put limits on conferees.

“My friend from Texas is like a schoolyard bully,” Reid said Monday evening. "He pushes everybody around and is losing, and instead of playing the game according to the rules, he not only takes the ball home with him, but he changes the rules that way no one wins except the bully who tries to indicate to people that he has won."

The Senate passed its first budget resolution in four years last month. Senate Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty MurrayPatty MurraySenate confirms Labor Secretary Acosta Dems unveil bill targeting LGBT harassment on college campuses Trump said he would create ‘more jobs and better wages’ — he can start with federal contractors MORE (D-Wash.) and House Budget Committee Chairman Paul RyanPaul RyanKudlow: Trump's tax plan 'a home run' Samantha Bee roasts Trump at mock correspondents' dinner Ryan's home state highlights challenge for GOP high-risk insurer pools MORE (R-Wis.) have been meeting about setting up a conference, but Democrats say the House GOP is dragging its feet because they’re afraid of a backlash from Tea Party elements within the GOP ranks.

The House-passed budget cuts $4.6 trillion in spending on top of the $1.2 trillion sequestration cuts already scheduled to take effect, and it balances in 10 years.

The Senate-passed budget has $975 billion in new taxes, does not balance, and turns off sequestration.