ADVERTISEMENT
Sen. Mark KirkMark KirkHigh stakes as Trump heads to Hill Five things to watch for at Trump-Senate GOP meeting Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns MORE (R-Ill.) voted against Coburn's amendment, while Democratic Sens. Kay HaganKay HaganPolitics is purple in North Carolina Democrats can win North Carolina just like Jimmy Carter did in 1976 North Carolina will be a big battleground state in 2020 MORE (N.C.), Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampThe Hill's 12:30 Report Avalanche of Democratic senators say Franken should resign Senate panel moves forward with bill to roll back Dodd-Frank MORE (N.D.), Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBooker tries to find the right lane  Top Lobbyists 2017: Hired Guns GOP tries to keep spotlight on taxes amid Mueller charges MORE (Mont.), Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyTrump rips Dems a day ahead of key White House meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report Avalanche of Democratic senators say Franken should resign MORE (Ind.), Mark PryorMark PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.), Mark BegichMark Peter BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (Alaska), Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterGOP and Dems bitterly divided by immigration Senate panel moves forward with bill to roll back Dodd-Frank GOP defeats Schumer bid to delay tax vote MORE (Mont.), Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichAvalanche of Democratic senators say Franken should resign Senators introduce bipartisan gun background check bill Dem senator: 'Super close' on bipartisan deal on guns MORE (N.M.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinTrump rips Dems a day ahead of key White House meeting Senate panel moves forward with bill to roll back Dodd-Frank Wealthy outsiders threaten to shake up GOP Senate primaries MORE (W.Va.), Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuProject Veritas at risk of losing fundraising license in New York, AG warns You want to recall John McCain? Good luck, it will be impossible CNN producer on new O'Keefe video: Voters are 'stupid,' Trump is 'crazy' MORE (La.), Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenDems demand Tillerson end State hiring freeze, consult with Congress The Hill Interview: GOP chairman says ‘red flags’ surround Russian cyber firm Schumer celebrates New York Giants firing head coach: ‘About time’ MORE (N.H.) and Independent Sen. Angus KingAngus Stanley KingTrump rips Dems a day ahead of key White House meeting Trump pushing Maine gov to run for Senate: report Schumer: Franken should resign MORE (Maine) voted for the measure.

Coburn said the Corp of Engineers projects are the most visited of federal agencies’ sites. He said his amendment would simply make the Corp recognize states’ conceal and carry gun laws, which is the case in national parks and forests.

“Why should we not have the same policy everywhere,” Coburn said. “Why would we do something different for the Corps’ land? … It’s common sense to have a consistent law on all federal lands.”

Coburn said the number of rapes and other crimes in national parks were reduced once guns were allowed.

Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Chairwoman Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerBarbara Boxer recounts harassment on Capitol Hill: ‘The entire audience started laughing’ 100 years of the Blue Slip courtesy Four more lawmakers say they’ve been sexually harassed by colleagues in Congress MORE (D-Calif.) said she didn’t understand why Republicans would want to take more votes on the controversial issue of guns, adding that she hoped all other amendments to her bill, S. 601, would be germane.

“I just want to lay it out here for the American people; this is a public works bill dealing with water infrastructure. … It is not a bill about guns,” Boxer said ahead of the amendment votes. “I hope we can avert and avoid so much controversy with this bill.”

Boxer also argued that guns are already allowed on Army Corp property as long as they are for hunting and target shooting. She said she didn’t support Coburn’s amendment because “it’s a public safety issue” for the Corp because it “has no employees that perform law enforcement duties” or carry weapons.

She and ranking member David VitterDavid VitterThe Senate 'ethics' committee is a black hole where allegations die Questions loom over Franken ethics probe You're fired! Why it's time to ditch the Fed's community banker seat MORE (R-La.) introduced the water bill, which passed unanimously out of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee in March.

“I too am very supportive of this bill, which I do think is a bipartisan reform-oriented effort,” Vitter said. “It is an important jobs, water way infrastructure bill.”

Boxer said the bill would support more than 500,000 U.S. jobs.

The Senate also voted 68-31 for an amendment from Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseOvernight Regulation: Net neutrality supporters predict tough court battle | Watchdog to investigate EPA chief's meeting with industry group | Ex-Volkswagen exec gets 7 years for emissions cheating Overnight Energy: Watchdog probes Pruitt speech to mining group | EPA chief promises to let climate scientists present their work | Volkswagen manager gets 7 years for emissions cheating EPA head pledges to protect climate scientists MORE (D-R.I.). His amendment would create a national endowment for the oceans to promote the protection and conservation of U.S. ocean; coastal; and Great Lakes ecosystems, although funding the trust would be decided later so that the amendment wouldn't add funding to the underlying bill.

The Senate is expected to continue work on the bipartisan water bill through the week.

This article was updated at 2:45 p.m. to include the vote on Whitehouse's amendment.