Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Chairwoman Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerThe ‘bang for the buck’ theory fueling Trump’s infrastructure plan Kamala Harris endorses Gavin Newsom for California governor Dems face hard choice for State of the Union response MORE (D-Calif.) and ranking member David VitterDavid Bruce VitterPlanned Parenthood targets judicial nominee over abortion comments Trump nominates wife of ex-Louisiana senator to be federal judge Where is due process in all the sexual harassment allegations? MORE (R-La.) introduced the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA). S. 601 would authorize Army Corp of Engineer projects related to flood and storm risk reduction, coast and inland navigation, and ecosystem restoration.

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The Senate rejected an amendment from Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoOvernight Energy: Watchdogs unveil findings on EPA, Interior controversies | GAO says EPA violated law with soundproof booth | IG says Zinke could have avoided charter flight | GOP chair probes Pruitt's four email addresses GOP chairman probes Pruitt’s four email addresses GAO: EPA violated law with Pruitt's soundproof booth MORE (R-Wyo.) that would have stopped the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from expanding what can be identified as waters protected under the Clean Water Act. His amendment failed on a 52-44 vote — there was a 60-vote threshold for final passage.

Democratic Sens. Kay HaganKay Ruthven Hagan2020 Dems compete for top campaign operatives Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Politics is purple in North Carolina MORE (N.C.), Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.), Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellySenate blocks bill that opponents say weakens water pollution rules Senate GOP wary of new tax cut sequel GOP Senate hopefuls race to catch up with Dems MORE (Ind.), Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampSenators, staffers lament the end of 50 Most Beautiful Senate blocks bill that opponents say weakens water pollution rules Senate GOP wary of new tax cut sequel MORE (N.D.), Mark BegichMark Peter BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (Alaska), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinSenate blocks bill that opponents say weakens water pollution rules GOP Senate hopeful convicted after mining disaster files to vacate conviction Senate repeals auto-loan guidance in precedent-shattering vote MORE (W.Va.), Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Project Veritas at risk of losing fundraising license in New York, AG warns You want to recall John McCain? Good luck, it will be impossible MORE (La.) and Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillSenate blocks bill that opponents say weakens water pollution rules Senate GOP wary of new tax cut sequel GOP Senate hopefuls race to catch up with Dems MORE (Mo.) voted with Republicans for Barrasso's amendment.

Barrasso said his amendment would have protected farmers and ranchers from the EPA, which has said it is considering holding more U.S. water bodies to higher standards under the Clean Water Act. He said the administration’s decision to expand waters to areas of farms would "have a huge impact on farmers and ranchers.”

Boxer urged her colleagues to vote against Barrasso’s amendment, calling it “an anti-environmental rider” to her bill.

“Without protections dangerous pollutants could be put into our water ways,” Boxer said ahead of the vote. “The Barrasso amendment is such an overreach that we will keep the state of U.S. waters in chaos. … Without these protections our drinking water would be at risk.”

An amendment from Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersSenators push HHS to negotiate lower prices on opioid overdose reversal drug New Zealand's female prime minister 'extremely angry' at Trump comparisons Dem senators unveil expanded public option for health insurance MORE (I-Vt.) was also held to a 60-vote threshold. His amendment would have allowed FEMA to fund stronger restoration standards for culverts and bridges in Vermont that were damaged by natural disasters. He said the goal was to prevent the structures from being damaged again. His amendment failed on a 56-40 vote.

Republican Sens. Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranChamber of Commerce makes play in Mississippi Senate race for Hyde-Smith Shelby approved as Appropriations panel chairman Cindy Hyde-Smith sworn in as Mississippi's latest senator MORE (Miss.), Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerLet's hold Facebook to the same standards as other players in the industry Cindy Hyde-Smith sworn in as Mississippi's latest senator Miss. Dem touts campaign poll saying he leads GOP candidates in Senate race MORE (Miss.), David Vitter (La.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTrump's NASA nominee advances after floor drama Family, friends mourn death of Barbara Bush Amid struggle for votes, GOP plows ahead with Cabinet picks MORE (Maine) voted with Democrats for the Sanders amendment.

Sen. Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnPension insolvency crisis only grows as Congress sits on its hands Paul Ryan should realize that federal earmarks are the currency of cronyism Republicans in Congress shouldn't try to bring back earmarks MORE (R-Okla.) said Sanders' amendment was "essentially an earmark" for his state.

The Senate accepted an amendment from Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeDems give muted praise to Pompeo-Kim meeting Overnight Energy: Former Pruitt aide alleges more wasteful spending, retaliation | Senate confirms EPA No. 2 | Zinke backs off big park fee increases Senate approves Trump’s pick for No. 2 at EPA MORE (R-Okla.) addressing federal land use in Oklahoma. His amendment passed by voice-vote.

Earlier Tuesday, the Senate approved 20 minor amendments en bloc.