Senate rejects border security amendment to immigration bill

The Senate voted 57-43 on Thursday to table an amendment to the immigration reform bill that would have required increased border security before granting temporary legal status for illegal immigrants. [WATCH VIDEO]

The amendment from Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyDefense bill renews fight over military sexual assault Reid knocks GOP over 'light' Senate schedule Overnight Tech: Facebook finds no bias but vows to change trending feature MORE (R-Iowa) would have prevented the government from granting provisional immigrant status until the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary has maintained effective control of the borders for six months.

Grassley blasted Democrats for burying his proposal, which was the first change to the Gang of Eight's immigration bill to be considered on the Senate floor.

ADVERTISEMENT
“This vote proves this ‘open and fair process’ is a farce,” Grassley said. “The majority is afraid of having a true vote on my amendment. … This is not the right way to start off on a very important bill.”

Grassley said the immigration bill repeats the mistakes made in the 1986 overhaul by “legalizing first and securing the border later, if ever.” 

Sens. Mark PryorMark PryorEx-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm Top Democrats are no advocates for DC statehood Ex-Sen. Landrieu joins law and lobby firm MORE (D-Ark.) and Joe ManchinJoe ManchinHow Congress got to yes on toxic chemical reform Red-state Dem hits back over coal, court attacks How Senate Democrats are trying to deal with Sanders MORE (D-W.Va.) were the only Democrats who voted against tabling the amendment.

Republicans senators from the Gang of Eight — Sens. Marco RubioMarco RubioKasich moves to hold on to his delegates Pressure builds from GOP to delay internet domain transition The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (Fla.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamRomney should endorse Clinton Graham: I'm still not supporting Trump North Korean official calls Trump idea of meeting 'nonsense' MORE (S.C.), John McCainJohn McCainGOP seeks to remove funding to design Gitmo alternative Big-name donors join Trump fundraising team Defense bill renews fight over military sexual assault MORE (Ariz.) and Jeff FlakeJeff FlakeOvernight Defense: Terrorism suspected in EgyptAir crash; McCain details funding plans Overnight Finance: Path clears for Puerto Rico bill | GOP senator casts doubt on IRS impeachment | Senate approves .1B for Zika Overnight Tech: Trade groups press NC on bathroom law MORE (Ariz.) — all voted to table Grassley's amendment, along with Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa MurkowskiOvernight Energy: Lawmakers closing in on chemical safety deal GOP chair pushes Obama official on Arctic drilling plan McConnell touts 'Senate squad' in Wes Anderson-style video MORE (R-Alaska).

Gang of Eight member Sen. Charles SchumerCharles SchumerOvernight Healthcare: House, Senate on collision course over Zika funding Ryan goes all-in on Puerto Rico Cruz's dad: Trump 'would be worse than Hillary Clinton' MORE (D-N.Y.) was among those who urged senators to vote down Grassley’s border security plan.

“It says that the 11 million people living in the shadows cannot even get the provisional status to work and travel until the secretary of Homeland Security says the border is completely secure and we know that will take years,” Schumer said. “The problem is very simple, what do we do for five or six years until the border is fully secure?”

The bipartisan bill from the Gang of Eight, S. 744, would create a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants already in the country, toughen border security, create a guest worker program and boost high-skilled immigration.

Some Republicans have complained that the legislation would provide amnesty in 13 years for the nearly 11 million residents in the U.S. illegally before strengthening border enforcement.

The bill already makes permanent legal residence contingent on Homeland Security having 100 percent situational awareness at every segment of the Southern border and a 90 percent apprehension rate of those trying to cross illegally.

But some Republicans have suggested that the bill gives the administrations too much say over whether the border is secure, leaving Congress powerless to stop the amnesty program if security measures aren’t met.

Those supporting the bill say it doesn’t include amnesty since people here illegally would be forced to undergo a background check, pay a fine and back taxes, learn English, and wait in line for a green card. The bill also appropriates an additional $6.5 billion for border security and enforcement measures.

This article was updated at 4:45 p.m.

More in Energy & Environment

Senate Dems block spending bill over Iran amendment — again

Read more »