Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyGrassley, Dems step up battle over judicial nominees Popular bill to fight drug prices left out of budget deal Judiciary Dems want public hearings with Kushner, Trump Jr. MORE (D-Vt.) called Vitter's amendment "prohibitively expensive" and urged colleagues to vote against it.

Republican Gang of Eight Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamCongress punts fight over Dreamers to March Pence tours Rio Grande between US and Mexico GOP looks for Plan B after failure of immigration measures MORE (S.C.), John McCainJohn Sidney McCainLawmakers worry about rise of fake video technology Democrats put Dreamers and their party in danger by playing hardball Trump set a good defense budget, but here is how to make it better MORE (Ariz.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioColbert: Students taking action on gun violence 'give me hope' Lawmakers feel pressure on guns Florida lawmaker's aide fired after claiming shooting survivors were 'actors' MORE (Fla.) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeFlake to try to force vote on DACA stopgap plan Congress punts fight over Dreamers to March Outgoing GOP rep: Republican Party 'heading into trouble' in election MORE (Ariz.) voted against Vitter's amendment, along with GOP Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiThe siren of Baton Rouge Interior plan to use drilling funds for new projects met with skepticism The 14 GOP senators who voted against Trump’s immigration framework MORE (Alaska), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Tech: Judge blocks AT&T request for DOJ communications | Facebook VP apologizes for tweets about Mueller probe | Tech wants Treasury to fight EU tax proposal Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand FCC to officially rescind net neutrality rules on Thursday MORE (Maine) and Kelley Ayotte (N.H.). Democratic Sen. Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.) voted for the entry-exit system amendment.

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The Senate is expected to continue amendment work on the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act throughout June. The bipartisan group of eight senators, known as the Gang of Eight, introduced S. 744, which would create a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants already in the country, toughen border security, create a guest worker program and boost high-skilled immigration.

McCain said Vitter’s amendment could “delay” the immigration process for years. He also pointed out that the underlying bill has entry-exit measures, including the implementation of a system at sea and air ports.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyPavlich: The claim Trump let the mentally ill get guns is a lie Congress fails miserably: For Asian-Americans, immigration proposals are personal attacks Grassley, Dems step up battle over judicial nominees MORE (R-Iowa) pointed out that an effective entry-exist system is already suppose to be in place but that previous administrations have “thumbed their noses at the laws on the books.” He added that the Gang of Eight bill weakens this law by saying entry-exit systems need to be in place at only some points of entrance and it doesn’t require it to be a biometric system, which uses finger prints.

“This is a border security issue,” Grassley said of Vitter’s amendment. “It’s a national security issue and without this measure we are not in control of our borders.”

Republicans have warned that some border security amendments have to be adopted in order to gain more GOP support for final passage of the bill.

The Senate voted on other amendments Tuesday afternoon — all were held to a 60-vote threshold for passage.

Sen. Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuProject Veritas at risk of losing fundraising license in New York, AG warns You want to recall John McCain? Good luck, it will be impossible CNN producer on new O'Keefe video: Voters are 'stupid,' Trump is 'crazy' MORE’s (D-La.) amendment was the first amendment accepted to the bill. Her amendment passed on by voice-vote and clarifies U.S. international adoption laws to ensure adoptees are granted U.S. citizenship. It would also repeal the pre-adoption parental visitation requirement for automatic citizenship and allow just one parent to visit the country of origin of the adoptee, rather than both adoptive parents.

Sen. Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterWith vote against Brownback, Democrats abandon religious freedom Democrat Manchin: Pence attacks prove ‘they don't want bipartisanship’ in Trump admin Tester invited the Border Patrol Union’s president to the State of the Union. What does that say to Dreamers?   MORE’s (D-Mont.) amendment received a 94-0 vote. It expands the new Border Oversight Task Force to include tribal members so they can make border security recommendations relating to Native American tribes on the Northern and Southern border.

Earlier Tuesday, the Senate rejected an amendment from Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneFlake to try to force vote on DACA stopgap plan Congress punts fight over Dreamers to March The 14 GOP senators who voted against Trump’s immigration framework MORE (R-S.D.), which would have required the construction of more border fencing before illegal immigrants were given provisional legal status.