The Senate voted 66-34 Tuesday to confirm President Obama’s nominee to lead the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).

Richard Cordray was one of several controversial nominees that Republicans will allow to get an up-or-down vote after Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidDems face identity crisis Heller under siege, even before healthcare Charles Koch thanks Harry Reid for helping his book sales MORE (D-Nev.) threatened to use the “nuclear option” to change the Senate rules by eliminating the ability of the minority to filibuster an executive branch nominee.

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"More than 700 days since its creation American citizens are just now getting a vote for a consumer watchdog to head the agency," Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod BrownDem calls for Senate to recognize LGBT Pride month after Trump didn't Major progressive group rolls out first incumbent House endorsement Dems push for more action on power grid cybersecurity MORE (D-Ohio) said after the vote. "Confirming Richard Cordray was the right thing to do."

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Earlier Tuesday, 17 Republicans joined Democrats in a 71-29 vote to end debate on Cordray’s nomination. 

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Republicans had objected to Cordray as a way to demand reforms to the bureau, which was created in 2010 by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act. CFPB was designed to protect consumers from predatory banks and lenders after the financial crisis partially caused by shady mortgage lending.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyGOP senators want surveillance requests from FBI Russia probe Overnight Cybersecurity: New ransomware attack spreads globally | US pharma giant hit | House intel panel interviews Podesta | US, Kenya deepen cyber partnership GOP chairman wants 'robust' tax reform process in the Senate MORE (R-Iowa) and other Republicans have complained that the bureau lacks congressional accountability and oversight. 

Sen. Mike CrapoMike CrapoOvernight Regulation: Senate Banking panel huddles with regulators on bank relief | FCC proposes 2M fine on robocaller | Yellowstone grizzly loses endangered protection Overnight Finance: Big US banks pass Fed stress tests | Senate bill repeals most ObamaCare taxes | Senate expected to pass Russian sanctions bill for second time All big US banks pass Dodd-Frank stress tests MORE (R-Idaho), ranking member on the Senate Banking Committee, also pointed out that Republicans want to replace Cordray's director position with a bipartisan “board of directors with staggered terms.” He also expressed concern over recent reports that the bureau is conducting “unprecedented data collection.”

“The CFPB is collecting credit card data, bank account data, mortgage data and student loan data,” Crapo said ahead of the vote. “This ultimately allows the CFPB to monitor a consumer’s monthly spending habits.”

The D.C. District Court recently ruled Cordray’s recess appointment was unconstitutional, but now with Senate backing he will be able to serve a full five-year term as head of the agency.

Earlier Tuesday, Reid announced lawmakers had a deal to avoid the “nuclear option” and hold votes on several of President Obama’s controversial nominees, in addition to Cordray.

Democrats are hoping to vote in the next two weeks on Fred Hochberg to be president of the Export-Import Bank, Thomas PerezThomas E. PerezClinton’s top five vice presidential picks Government social programs: Triumph of hope over evidence Labor’s 'wasteful spending and mismanagement” at Workers’ Comp MORE to be secretary of Labor, and Gina McCarthyGina McCarthyTrump’s budget prioritizes polluters over people Trump pulls US out of Paris deal: What it would mean Regulations, farmers and the law MORE to be administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, in addition to several National Labor Relations Board nominees.

Democrats said Cordray’s confirmation was needed to give banks and consumers certainty. Republicans argued that his nomination was delayed — nearly two years — because they were exercising the right to “advise and consent” on executive branch nominees granted under the Constitution.