Vitter’s amendment would prohibit housing authorities from giving violent criminals who have been convicted of violent or sexual assaults against women or children any taxpayer funded housing assistance.

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“I think it’s very reasonable and commonsense to say these crimes have serious consequences … like a stiff jail sentence,” Vitter said ahead of the vote. “But also that federal taxpayer won’t give you help for housing.”

Sen. John RockefellerJohn (Jay) Davison RockefellerSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Overnight Tech: Trump nominates Dem to FCC | Facebook pulls suspected baseball gunman's pages | Uber board member resigns after sexist comment Trump nominates former FCC Dem for another term MORE (D-W.Va.) was the only senator to vote against Vitter's amendment.

Earlier Tuesday, the Senate voted 73-26 to proceed to consideration of S. 1243, the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development (THUD) Appropriations bill, which funds government transportation and housing agencies.

There is a $91 billion difference in spending levels between the House and Senate appropriations this year. For the THUD bill, the difference is $10 billion. The Senate bill is  $54 billion, while the House has a $44 billion bill, which is a cut of $7 billion from last year’s spending level.

The House Republican bill cuts the Community Development Block Grant program and high-speed rail projects, while Senate Democrats maintain most existing funding for those programs.

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsDem rep to launch discharge petition to force net neutrality vote in House Hillicon Valley: Senate votes to save net neutrality | Senate panel breaks with House, says Russia favored Trump in 2016 | Latest from Cambridge Analytica whistleblower | Lawmakers push back on helping Chinese tech giant Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — ObamaCare premium wars are back MORE (R-Maine), the ranking Republican on the Appropriations subcommittee that handled the bill, said she supported Vitter’s amendment because it would help protect those living in federal housing against violent criminals.

The Transportation bill is the first of 12 annual spending bills the Senate has taken up.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidMcConnell not yet ready to change rules for Trump nominees The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by CVS Health — Trump’s love-hate relationship with the Senate Trump to press GOP on changing Senate rules MORE (D-Nev.) said he selected that appropriations bill to bring to the floor first to highlight the spending differences between the House and Senate, in an effort to push Republicans into forming a budget conference committee.

The Senate is expected to continue work on the bill throughout most of the week. Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — Trump official won't OK lifetime limits on Medicaid Dems warn against changes to federal family planning program Overnight Health Care: Drug company under scrutiny for Michael Cohen payments | New Ebola outbreak | FDA addresses EpiPen shortage MORE (D-Wash.), the chairman of the subcommittee encouraged senators to offer amendments to work on the bill could be quickly completely.