Cory Booker to testify against Sessions's nomination

Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) will testify against his colleague, Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsFederal judge rules Trump defunding sanctuary cities 'unconstitutional on its face' FBI informant gathered years of evidence on Russian push for US nuclear fuel deals, including Uranium One, memos show Alabama election has GOP racing against the clock MORE, during Wednesday's confirmation hearing for President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpO’Malley tells Dems not to fear Trump Right way and wrong way Five things to know about the elephant trophies controversy MORE's attorney general pick. 
 
Booker said Monday night he does not "take the decision lightly" to speak against a fellow senator, but he believes the Alabama Republican's positions on a myriad of issues are "deeply troubling."
 
"Senator Sessions’ decades-long record is concerning in a number of ways," said Booker. "The Attorney General is responsible for ensuring the fair administration of justice, and based on his record, I lack confidence that Senator Sessions can honor this duty." 
 

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It appears Booker will be the first sitting senator to testify against a colleague during a confirmation hearing. 
 
The New Jersey Democrat, who is black, explained the unprecedented step by pointing to Sessions's opposition to a bipartisan criminal justice reform bill that Booker has been involved with since joining the Senate, as well as his views on reforming drug policy, his opposition to comprehensive immigration reform and his "failure to defend" minority groups, women and LGBT Americans. 
 
Booker will speak before the committee on Wednesday along with Reps. John Lewis (D-Ga.) and Cedric Richmond (D-La.), the chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, according to a release from the Senate Judiciary Committee. 
 
Booker's office also announced his — who is the subject of early speculation as a potential 2020 president candidate — plan on Twitter. 

It's unlikely that Democrats will be able to block the Sessions nomination. Under the 2013 "nuclear option," most nominees only need a simple majority vote to clear the upper chamber. 
 
Republicans have a 52-seat majority. Moderate GOP Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsStates fill family caregiver void left by Congress GOP senator: ObamaCare fix could be in funding bill Collins: Pass bipartisan ObamaCare bills before mandate repeal MORE (Maine) is one of two senators introducing Sessions at his confirmation hearing. 
 
Though Sessions is well-liked by his colleagues, Democrats have pledged for months to fight his nomination. They've raised questions about whether Sessions would be able to apply the law equally to all Americans and if he'll be able to say no to Trump. 
 
Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownScott Garrett poses real threat to EXIM Bank, small businesses Class warfare fight erupts over tax bills Senators Hatch, Brown have heated exchange on GOP tax plan MORE (D-Ohio), noting Booker's involvement in the nomination, became the first senator to officially say he would vote against Sessions. 
 
"You don't vote for somebody just because he's a Senate colleague and you have something called Senatorial courtesy," he told MSNBC. "You vote based on, not even entirely his past, you vote on his future and what an attorney general for the next four years is going to do." 
 
Sessions's confirmation hearing comes roughly 30 years after his nomination for a federal judgeship was torpedoed by allegations of racism, which Sessions has repeatedly denied.