Intel Committee Dems to Trump: Read torture report
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Democrats on the Senate Intelligence Committee are urging President Trump to read a 2014 report on the CIA's programs before deciding to restart "enhanced interrogation."  

Seven senators on the committee sent a letter to Trump on Thursday saying it is of the "utmost importance" that he read the committee's findings. 

"To avoid making the mistakes of the past it is of the utmost importance that you familiarize yourself with, and ensure that any Executive Branch officials involved in the formation of policy on detention and interrogation review, the full Committee study," they wrote in the letter. 

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerVirginia Dems want answers on alleged detention center abuse Wray defends FBI after 'sobering' watchdog report Top Dems: IG report shows Comey's actions helped Trump win election MORE (D-Va.), the top Democrat on the committee, as well as Democratic Sens. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinChildren should not be human shields against immigration enforcement The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — Immigration drama grips Washington Grassley wants to subpoena Comey, Lynch after critical IG report MORE (Calif.), Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenScrutiny ramps up over Commerce secretary's stock moves Hillicon Valley: Justices require warrants for cellphone location data | Amazon employees protest facial recognition tech sales | Uber driver in fatal crash was streaming Hulu | SpaceX gets contract to launch spy satellite On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Supreme Court allows states to collect sales taxes from online retailers | Judge finds consumer bureau structure unconstitutional | Banks clear Fed stress tests MORE (Ore.),  Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichCNN congressional correspondent talks about her early love of trolls and family Overnight Energy: DNC to reject fossil fuel donations | Regulators see no security risk in coal plant closures | Senate committee rejects Trump EPA, Interior budgets Energy commission sees no national security risk from coal plant closures MORE (N.M.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — Trump caves under immense pressure — what now? Election Countdown: Family separation policy may haunt GOP in November | Why Republican candidates are bracing for surprises | House Dems rake in record May haul | 'Dumpster fire' ad goes viral Manchin up 9 points over GOP challenger in W.Va. Senate race MORE (W.Va.), Kamala Harris (Calif.) and Independent Sen. Angus KingAngus Stanley KingMaine Senate candidate arrested outside immigration detention center Icebreaking ships are not America’s top priority in the Arctic Heckler yells ‘Mr. President, f--- you’ as Trump arrives at Capitol MORE (Maine) signed the letter. 

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They added that the report was meant to be used for any future interrogation guidelines and "remains a critical resource for anyone considering detention and interrogation policy." 

The 2014 report found that many of the CIA's practices were overly brutal and possibly illegal. The Democrats noted that both Mike Pompeo, the new CIA director, and Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump administration creating family reunification task force: report Mexican airline pledges to reunite immigrant families separated by Trump policy for free Jennifer Lopez sounds off on Trump immigration policy MORE, nominated to be attorney general, pledged that they would review the full report. 

A draft executive order circulated this week sparked a new round of debate over interrogation techniques, including waterboarding.

The order would revoke a series of Obama administration rules that closed CIA "black sites," granted Red Cross access to all detainees and limited interrogators to techniques approved in the Army Field Manual. 

The Senate Democrats said reports that Trump is considering restarting the Bush-era programs are "deeply troubling." 

But White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Wednesday the document wasn't from the White House, adding, “I have no idea where it came from."

But he refused to answer questions about whether Trump was weighing the basic policy recommendations contained in the draft order. 

Trump signaled during an interview with ABC News on Wednesday that his administration would be announcing its plan for CIA black sites within hours, but as of Thursday evening the White House hadn't made an announcement.

He also noted that he had been discussing waterboarding "as recently as 24 hours ago with people at the highest level of intelligence."

Feinstein previously pushed late last year for the outgoing Obama administration to make the full 7,000-page document public. 

While Obama told Senate Intelligence leaders he would preserve report in his presidential papers, he didn't declassify the document before leaving office earlier this month.