Senators are moving to shore up the U.S.-Australian relationship after reports of a contentious call between President Trump and the Australian prime minister. 
 
"I don't know what happened during last week's telephone call between the president of the United States and the prime minister of Australia," Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar Alexander13 GOP senators ask administration to pause separation of immigrant families IBM-led coalition pushes senators for action on better tech skills training Dems seek to leverage ObamaCare fight for midterms MORE (R-Tenn.) said from the Senate floor. 
 
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"But I do know this, the people of the United States do not have better friends than the people of Australia. We're more than friends." 

The Washington Post reported last week that Trump lashed out at Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull during a phone call between the leaders.

The president boasted about his Electoral College victory, blasted a previous plan under which the U.S. would accept refugees from Australia and cut short what was expected to be an hourlong call, according to the Post. 

In the wake of the call, GOP Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump's America fights back Mellman: Trump can fix it GOP strategist Steve Schmidt denounces party, will vote for Democrats MORE (Ariz.) and Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerOn The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Senators hammers Ross on Trump tariffs | EU levies tariffs on US goods | Senate rejects Trump plan to claw back spending Senators hammer Ross over Trump tariffs GOP senator demands details on 'damaging' tariffs MORE (Tenn.) made phone calls to Joe Hockey, the Australian ambassador to the U.S., to voice their support of the alliance. 

The senators added in the resolution that "an alliance bond is a sacred vow of friendship and trust, and Australia has always been a faithful and reliable partner to the United States."

Alexander, whose family spent six months in Australia after he stepped down from the governor's office, praised the two countries' ties, noting they have fought together dating back to World War One.

"Today no two countries trust one another and cooperate in security agreements more than Australia and America. We trade. We visit one another," Alexander said.

Sens. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntGOP senators introduce bill to prevent family separations at border Ernst, Fischer to square off for leadership post Facebook gives 500 pages of answers to lawmakers' data privacy questions MORE (R-Mo.), Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDemocrats protest Trump's immigration policy from Senate floor Live coverage: FBI chief, Justice IG testify on critical report Hugh Hewitt to Trump: 'It is 100 percent wrong to separate border-crossing families' MORE (D-Ill.), Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenAmerica will not forget about Pastor Andrew Brunson Shaheen sidelined after skin surgery Members of Congress demand new federal gender pay audit MORE (D-N.H.), Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii), Chris CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsSenate moderates hunt for compromise on family separation bill All the times Horowitz contradicted Wray — but nobody seemed to notice Hillicon Valley: Trump hits China with massive tech tariffs | Facebook meets with GOP leaders over bias allegations | Judge sends Manafort to jail ahead of trial | AT&T completes Time Warner purchase MORE (D-Del.), and Cory Booker (D-N.J.), are also supporting the resolution. 

Reps. Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.) and Jackie Speier (D-Calif.) introduced an identical resolution in the House.