Rubio, along with Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Health Care: Trump officials to allow work requirements for Medicaid GOP senator: CBO moving the goalposts on ObamaCare mandate Cornyn: Senate GOP tax plan to be released Thursday MORE (R-Utah) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Finance: GOP criticism of tax bill grows, but few no votes | Highlights from day two of markup | House votes to overturn joint-employer rule | Senate panel approves North Korean banking sanctions GOP criticism of tax bill grows, but few ready to vote against it Anti-gay marriage county clerk Kim Davis to seek reelection in Kentucky MORE (R-Texas), argued this summer that the vote on increasing the debt ceiling was the “last, best chance” Republicans had to stop President Obama’s signature healthcare law. But some of their GOP colleagues said the plan was flawed because it risked a government default and an economic catastrophe.

ADVERTISEMENT
Senate leaders Harry ReidHarry ReidTop Lobbyists 2017: Grass roots Boehner confronted Reid after criticism from Senate floor GOP in uncharted territory rolling back rules through resolutions MORE (D-Nev.) and Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell expects Paul to return to Senate next week Former Hill staff calls for mandatory harassment training Gaming the odds of any GOP tax bill getting signed into law MORE (R-Ky.) announced a bipartisan fiscal deal Wednesday after House Republicans failed to attach ObamaCare limitations.

The Senate bill would end the shutdown, fund the government through Jan. 15 and raise the debt ceiling until Feb. 7. It also calls for a budget conference between the House and Senate that would have to report back by Dec. 15 and requires stricter income verification for recipients of ObamaCare subsidies.

The House and Senate are expected to pass that legislation later Wednesday — only hours before the Treasury has said it would no longer be able to borrow money. Republicans who oppose the bill have said they won't filibuster it.

“Tonight the government will be reopened and the debt limit will be lifted but our real problems will still be here,” Rubio said.

Republicans are expected to still try to achieve major entitlement reforms, including to ObamaCare, during long-term budget negotiations. But Democrats have said they won’t repeal the law because it has already benefited those younger than 26 who can stay on their parents’ plan, people with preexisting conditions that cannot be denied coverage, and women who don’t have to pay for preventative care.