Rubio, along with Sens. Mike LeeMike LeeLessons from the godfather of regulatory budgeting Congress must reform civil asset forfeiture laws A guide to the committees: Senate MORE (R-Utah) and Ted CruzTed CruzTHE MEMO: Trump takes the fight to Congress Brietbart CEO reveals that Trump donors are part owners At CPAC, Trump lashes out at media MORE (R-Texas), argued this summer that the vote on increasing the debt ceiling was the “last, best chance” Republicans had to stop President Obama’s signature healthcare law. But some of their GOP colleagues said the plan was flawed because it risked a government default and an economic catastrophe.

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Senate leaders Harry ReidHarry ReidSanders and Schumer are right: Ellison for DNC chair The Hill's 12:30 Report Hopes rise for law to expand access to experimental drugs MORE (D-Nev.) and Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellGOP grapples with repeal of popular ObamaCare policy New DNC chairman wastes no time going after Trump Dem 2020 hopefuls lead pack in opposing Trump Cabinet picks MORE (R-Ky.) announced a bipartisan fiscal deal Wednesday after House Republicans failed to attach ObamaCare limitations.

The Senate bill would end the shutdown, fund the government through Jan. 15 and raise the debt ceiling until Feb. 7. It also calls for a budget conference between the House and Senate that would have to report back by Dec. 15 and requires stricter income verification for recipients of ObamaCare subsidies.

The House and Senate are expected to pass that legislation later Wednesday — only hours before the Treasury has said it would no longer be able to borrow money. Republicans who oppose the bill have said they won't filibuster it.

“Tonight the government will be reopened and the debt limit will be lifted but our real problems will still be here,” Rubio said.

Republicans are expected to still try to achieve major entitlement reforms, including to ObamaCare, during long-term budget negotiations. But Democrats have said they won’t repeal the law because it has already benefited those younger than 26 who can stay on their parents’ plan, people with preexisting conditions that cannot be denied coverage, and women who don’t have to pay for preventative care.