Senate Democrats held a nearly four-hour talk-a-thon on Monday night to protest the latest GOP bill to repeal and replace ObamaCare ahead of a potential vote next week. 

 
 
 
"It's just another version of the same old cruel, heartless, shameless plan that Republicans have spent the last eight months trying to jam down the throats of the American people," she said from the Senate floor. 
 
 
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Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDems mull big changes after Brazile bombshell Senators push mandatory sexual harassment training for members, staff Schumer: Dems want DACA fix in government spending bill MORE (D-N.J.) said the upcoming debate over the Graham-Cassidy health care bill is a "moral moment" and a "call to the conscience of our country." 

"We face a time of jeopardy. Decision point. A cross roads ... of our values, a cross roads of our ideals," he said. "The decisions made here are not always easy." 
 
In addition to Merkley, Warren, Durbin and Booker, Democratic Sens. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinNo room for amnesty in our government spending bill Bipartisan lawmakers can rebuild trust by passing infusion therapy bill Dem super PAC rolls out seven-figure ad campaign defending Baldwin in Wisconsin MORE (Wis.), Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyBipartisan group of lawmakers aim to reform US sugar program Scarborough: 'Washington would be melting down' if shooter was 'named Muhammad' Dems renew calls for gun control in wake of Texas church shooting MORE Jr. (Pa.), Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenLobbying World Overnight Regulation: House to vote on repealing joint-employer rule | EPA won't say which areas don't meet Obama smog rule | Lawmakers urge regulators to reject Perry plan New tax plan will hinder care for older Americans MORE (Ore.) and Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzSEC nominees must not grant companies 'safe harbor' with buyback rule Justice, AT&T trade accusations over CNN sale Ex-Yahoo, Equifax execs hammered over massive hacks MORE (Hawaii) spoke from the floor.
 
"I want to be clear, this Cassidy bill will flunk the Jimmy Kimmel test of not hurting kids in America with pre-existing conditions," Wyden said. 
 
Murphy, wrapping up the Democratic speeches, argued that the Graham-Cassidy healthcare bill was the "meanest version of TrumpCare yet." 

"Kids are going to die if they don't have access to healthcare," Murphy said. "If 20 million people lose insurance ... thousands of people won't be able to survive." 

The CBO hasn't estimated yet how many individuals would lose their health insurance under the Graham-Cassidy bill. The agency previously estimated that 22 million people could become uninsured under previous GOP bill. 

Murphy noted that as a member of the Senate's Health Committee he's been working on a bipartisan deal aimed at stabilizing health insurance markets. 

"What a great trick Republicans will have pulled on this country. Everybody said that the repeal bill was dead; that we were going to move on to a bipartisan process," he said. "What a great head fake that would be if it was all a lie. If it was all a ruse." 
 
The speeches come after Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTrump is right: The visa lotto has got to go Schumer predicts bipartisan support for passing DACA fix this year No room for amnesty in our government spending bill MORE (D-N.Y.) warned that Democrats were "going to look at every possible way to slow this bill down.” 
 
In addition to floor speeches, Booker also held a Facebook Live event with colleagues, including Schumer, off the Senate floor to discuss the GOP healthcare bill.  
 
Democrats don't have the ability to block a GOP ObamaCare repeal bill on their own. Under the special "reconciliation" budget rules being used by Republicans, which expire at the end of the month, GOP lawmakers can avoid a Democratic filibuster and pass a healthcare bill with a simple majority. 
 
A repeal bill has little chance of passing the Senate if Democrats are able to filibuster it, meaning Republicans would need to win over at least eight Democrats to pass a bill. 
 
 
Cassidy and Graham have said believe they have roughly 48 GOP senators who would be willing to vote yes, putting them close, but not yet at, the 50 votes needed to let Vice President Pence break a tie. 
 
 
 

—Last updated at 11:09 p.m.