Senate Democrats held a nearly four-hour talk-a-thon on Monday night to protest the latest GOP bill to repeal and replace ObamaCare ahead of a potential vote next week. 

 
The Democratic floor protest ran just under four hours, kicking off at 6:51 p.m. with a speech by Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinGun proposal picks up GOP support Durbin: I had 'nothing to do' with Curbelo snub Republicans jockey for position on immigration MORE (D-Ill.) and wrapping around 10:40 p.m. 
 
 
"It's just another version of the same old cruel, heartless, shameless plan that Republicans have spent the last eight months trying to jam down the throats of the American people," she said from the Senate floor. 
 
"We've been through this conversation. We've been through the Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzWhatever you think the Alabama special election means, you’re probably wrong This week: Congress gets ball rolling on tax reform Week ahead: Senators work toward deal to fix ObamaCare markets MORE fake insurance bill. ... [Help] drive a stake through this health care monster," he said. 
 
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Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerChris Murphy’s profile rises with gun tragedies Lawmakers target third-party ticket websites Overnight Health Care: Trump unhappy with Price over private jet use | Trump to allow insurance plans to be sold across state lines | Dems want probe into ObamaCare website shutdowns MORE (D-N.J.) said the upcoming debate over the Graham-Cassidy health care bill is a "moral moment" and a "call to the conscience of our country." 

"We face a time of jeopardy. Decision point. A cross roads ... of our values, a cross roads of our ideals," he said. "The decisions made here are not always easy." 
 
In addition to Merkley, Warren, Durbin and Booker, Democratic Sens. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinKoch-backed group targets red-state Dems on tax reform Justices weigh partisan gerrymandering in potential landmark case Dems plan to make gun control an issue in Nevada MORE (Wis.), Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyDem senator: Inaction on gun control sending 'unintentional endorsement' Congress has a chance to make saving for college a lot easier Sen. Manchin won’t vote for Trump’s mine safety nominee MORE Jr. (Pa.), Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenHouse bill set to reignite debate on warrantless surveillance Senate confirms No. 2 spot at HHS, days after Price resigns Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax CEO faces outraged lawmakers | Dem presses voting machine makers on cyber defense | Yahoo says 3 billion accounts affected by 2013 breach MORE (Ore.) and Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzChris Murphy’s profile rises with gun tragedies Senators grill ex-Equifax CEO over stock sales Overnight Cybersecurity: Trump proclaims 'Cybersecurity Awareness Month' | Equifax missed chance to patch security flaw | Lawmakers await ex-CEO's testimony | SEC hack exposed personal data MORE (Hawaii) spoke from the floor.
 
"I want to be clear, this Cassidy bill will flunk the Jimmy Kimmel test of not hurting kids in America with pre-existing conditions," Wyden said. 
 
Murphy, wrapping up the Democratic speeches, argued that the Graham-Cassidy healthcare bill was the "meanest version of TrumpCare yet." 

"Kids are going to die if they don't have access to healthcare," Murphy said. "If 20 million people lose insurance ... thousands of people won't be able to survive." 

The CBO hasn't estimated yet how many individuals would lose their health insurance under the Graham-Cassidy bill. The agency previously estimated that 22 million people could become uninsured under previous GOP bill. 

Murphy noted that as a member of the Senate's Health Committee he's been working on a bipartisan deal aimed at stabilizing health insurance markets. 

"What a great trick Republicans will have pulled on this country. Everybody said that the repeal bill was dead; that we were going to move on to a bipartisan process," he said. "What a great head fake that would be if it was all a lie. If it was all a ruse." 
 
 
In addition to floor speeches, Booker also held a Facebook Live event with colleagues, including Schumer, off the Senate floor to discuss the GOP healthcare bill.  
 
Democrats don't have the ability to block a GOP ObamaCare repeal bill on their own. Under the special "reconciliation" budget rules being used by Republicans, which expire at the end of the month, GOP lawmakers can avoid a Democratic filibuster and pass a healthcare bill with a simple majority. 
 
A repeal bill has little chance of passing the Senate if Democrats are able to filibuster it, meaning Republicans would need to win over at least eight Democrats to pass a bill. 
 
 
Cassidy and Graham have said believe they have roughly 48 GOP senators who would be willing to vote yes, putting them close, but not yet at, the 50 votes needed to let Vice President Pence break a tie. 
 
If Democrats want to block the bill they need to win over at least three GOP senators. Republican Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiRepublicans jockey for position on immigration GOP senator knocks Trump: 'Not a fan of governing by tweet' How the effort to replace ObamaCare failed MORE (Alaska), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGun proposal picks up GOP support Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns Agricultural trade demands investment in MAP and FMD MORE (Maine) and John McCainJohn Sidney McCainRubio asks Army to kick out West Point grad with pro-communist posts The VA's woes cannot be pinned on any singular administration Overnight Defense: Mattis offers support for Iran deal | McCain blocks nominees over Afghanistan strategy | Trump, Tillerson spilt raises new questions about N. Korea policy MORE (Ariz.) previously voted against the July repeal effort. 
 
 

—Last updated at 11:09 p.m.