Senate Democrats held a nearly four-hour talk-a-thon on Monday night to protest the latest GOP bill to repeal and replace ObamaCare ahead of a potential vote next week. 

 
The Democratic floor protest ran just under four hours, kicking off at 6:51 p.m. with a speech by Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinAmerica’s waning commitment to the promise of the First Amendment Senate rejects Trump immigration plan What to watch for in the Senate immigration votes MORE (D-Ill.) and wrapping around 10:40 p.m. 
 
 
"It's just another version of the same old cruel, heartless, shameless plan that Republicans have spent the last eight months trying to jam down the throats of the American people," she said from the Senate floor. 
 
 
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Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee Senate rejects centrist immigration bill after Trump veto threat Sen. Gillibrand, eyeing 2020 bid, rankles some Democrats MORE (D-N.J.) said the upcoming debate over the Graham-Cassidy health care bill is a "moral moment" and a "call to the conscience of our country." 

"We face a time of jeopardy. Decision point. A cross roads ... of our values, a cross roads of our ideals," he said. "The decisions made here are not always easy." 
 
In addition to Merkley, Warren, Durbin and Booker, Democratic Sens. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinAmerican women will decide who wins and loses in 2018 elections Grassley, Dems step up battle over judicial nominees 10 Senate Democrats are up for reelection in Trump country MORE (Wis.), Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyDems hit stock buybacks in tax law fight Dem senator warns Mueller against issuing Russia report near 2018 election Dem praises gay US Olympian who feuded with Pence MORE Jr. (Pa.), Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOvernight Health Care: Trump eases rules on insurance outside ObamaCare | HHS office on religious rights gets 300 complaints in a month | GOP chair eyes opioid bill vote by Memorial Day Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare Grassley, Dems step up battle over judicial nominees MORE (Ore.) and Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzSchatz's ignorance of our Anglo-American legal heritage illustrates problem with government Dem senator trolls Trump over Mueller indictments: 'This is a VERY well done hoax' Trashing our Anglo-American legal tradition does no one any favors MORE (Hawaii) spoke from the floor.
 
"I want to be clear, this Cassidy bill will flunk the Jimmy Kimmel test of not hurting kids in America with pre-existing conditions," Wyden said. 
 
Murphy, wrapping up the Democratic speeches, argued that the Graham-Cassidy healthcare bill was the "meanest version of TrumpCare yet." 

"Kids are going to die if they don't have access to healthcare," Murphy said. "If 20 million people lose insurance ... thousands of people won't be able to survive." 

The CBO hasn't estimated yet how many individuals would lose their health insurance under the Graham-Cassidy bill. The agency previously estimated that 22 million people could become uninsured under previous GOP bill. 

Murphy noted that as a member of the Senate's Health Committee he's been working on a bipartisan deal aimed at stabilizing health insurance markets. 

"What a great trick Republicans will have pulled on this country. Everybody said that the repeal bill was dead; that we were going to move on to a bipartisan process," he said. "What a great head fake that would be if it was all a lie. If it was all a ruse." 
 
The speeches come after Senate Minority Leader Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerDemocrats now attack internet rules they once embraced Schumer: Trump budget would ‘cripple’ gun background checks Schumer: Senate Republicans' silence 'deafening' on guns, Russia MORE (D-N.Y.) warned that Democrats were "going to look at every possible way to slow this bill down.” 
 
In addition to floor speeches, Booker also held a Facebook Live event with colleagues, including Schumer, off the Senate floor to discuss the GOP healthcare bill.  
 
Democrats don't have the ability to block a GOP ObamaCare repeal bill on their own. Under the special "reconciliation" budget rules being used by Republicans, which expire at the end of the month, GOP lawmakers can avoid a Democratic filibuster and pass a healthcare bill with a simple majority. 
 
A repeal bill has little chance of passing the Senate if Democrats are able to filibuster it, meaning Republicans would need to win over at least eight Democrats to pass a bill. 
 
 
Cassidy and Graham have said believe they have roughly 48 GOP senators who would be willing to vote yes, putting them close, but not yet at, the 50 votes needed to let Vice President Pence break a tie. 
 
If Democrats want to block the bill they need to win over at least three GOP senators. Republican Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiThe siren of Baton Rouge Interior plan to use drilling funds for new projects met with skepticism The 14 GOP senators who voted against Trump’s immigration framework MORE (Alaska), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Tech: Judge blocks AT&T request for DOJ communications | Facebook VP apologizes for tweets about Mueller probe | Tech wants Treasury to fight EU tax proposal Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand FCC to officially rescind net neutrality rules on Thursday MORE (Maine) and John McCainJohn Sidney McCainLawmakers worry about rise of fake video technology Democrats put Dreamers and their party in danger by playing hardball Trump set a good defense budget, but here is how to make it better MORE (Ariz.) previously voted against the July repeal effort. 
 
 

—Last updated at 11:09 p.m.