GOP senator breaks with Roy Moore over Muslims serving in Congress
© Greg Nash
Sen. John CornynJohn CornynLawmakers feel pressure on guns Kasich’s campaign website tones down gun language after Florida shooting Murphy: Trump’s support for background check bill shows gun politics ‘shifting rapidly’ MORE (R-Texas) said on Monday that he disagrees with Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore's previous criticism over letting Muslims serve in Congress
 
"I think just because you're a member of a political party doesn't mean you agree 100 percent. ...So I would disagree with that statement and I dare say if you asked each one of the members up here, what they would feel about that, they would say the same thing," Cornyn told reporters during a press conference, referring to several other GOP senators standing beside him. 
 
The lawmakers were asked how they "square" their criticism of Democrats questioning Trump's circuit court nominee, Amy Barrett, over her Catholic faith with their support for Moore given his previous suggestion that Rep. Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonPaul Ryan deletes tweet touting .50 pay hike after backlash Social media users slam Ryan for tweet on .50 pay hike Dems want info on Labor Dept hiding unfavorable report on impacts of tip-pooling rule MORE (D-Minn.), the first Muslim elected to the House, should be blocked from serving in Congress because of his religious beliefs. 
 
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Cornyn announced his support for Moore, who is the GOP nominee for the Alabama Senate race after defeating Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeThe Trump Presidency: Year One Dems search for winning playbook Stephen Bannon steps down from Breitbart MORE (R-Ala.) in the GOP primary, last week. 
 
In 2006, Moore took issue with Ellison becoming the first Muslim elected to Congress, arguing that lawmakers can and should stop him from taking his oath of office. 
 
”Enough evidence exists for Congress to question Ellison’s qualifications to be a member of Congress as well as his commitment to the Constitution in view of his apparent determination to embrace the Quran and an Islamic philosophy directly contrary to the principles of the Constitution," Moore wrote at the time
 
He added that "in 1943, we would never have allowed a member of Congress to take their oath on 'Mein Kampf,' or someone in the 1950s to swear allegiance to the 'Communist Manifesto."