Senators push mandatory sexual harassment training for members, staff
© Greg Nash

Senators are pushing for changes to the Senate's sexual harassment policy, including making training mandatory.

Sens. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGOP senators eager for Romney to join them Five hurdles to a big DACA and border deal Grand jury indicts Maryland executive in Uranium One deal: report MORE (R-Iowa), Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinDHS chief takes heat over Trump furor NSA spying program overcomes key Senate hurdle Democrats will need to explain if they shut government down over illegal immigration MORE (D-Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharOvernight Cybersecurity: Bipartisan bill aims to deter election interference | Russian hackers target Senate | House Intel panel subpoenas Bannon | DHS giving 'active defense' cyber tools to private sector Pawlenty opts out of Senate run in Minnesota Nielsen says 'possible' Trump used vulgar language in meeting MORE (D-Minn.), Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstIowa voters laugh after GOP senator says Trump is standing up for Norway Dems face hard choice for State of the Union response Family caregivers need a voice in our political debate MORE (R-Iowa), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandTrump thinks he could easily beat Sanders in 2020 match-up: report Listen: EMILY’s List upbeat about Dem House in '19 Desperate Democrats shouldn't settle for Oprah MORE (D-N.Y.), Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoGOP may increase IRS’s budget People with addiction issues should be able to control their own health data Trump signs bipartisan bill to combat synthetic opioids MORE (R-W.Va.), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP senators eager for Romney to join them The House needs to help patients from being victimized by antiquated technology Comey’s original Clinton memo released, cites possible violations MORE (R-Wis.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDHS chief takes heat over Trump furor Booker to Nielsen: 'Your silence and your amnesia is complicity' Homeland Security secretary grilled over Trump comments MORE (D-N.J.) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSessions torched by lawmakers for marijuana move Calif. Republican attacks Sessions over marijuana policy Trump's executive order on minerals will boost national defense MORE (R-Alaska) introduced a resolution on Tuesday to require members, staff, interns, fellows and detailees to complete the training.

The resolution calls for the Senate Rules Committee to issue rules for sexual harassment training, including requiring training within 60 days once a member or Senate staffer starts their position, and would also give 60 days for anyone who has not previously undergone training to complete it.

"Today, I’m introducing a bipartisan resolution to ensure that the Rules Committee has the authority necessary to ensure that every member of this chamber, every employee on the Senate payroll, and every unpaid Senate intern receives anti-harassment training," Grassley said in a prepared statement.

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Grassley previously asked the Rules Committee, overseen by Klobuchar and Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyMoore supporters fire back at Richard Shelby Disaster aid becomes hostage to funding fight WATCH: GOP senators urge Romney to run for Senate MORE (R-Ala.), to make training mandatory, but was told that the Senate would likely need to pass a resolution giving them that authority.

Klobuchar reiterated that she believes sexual harassment training should be mandatory. 
 “I look forward to working with Senator Grassley and my Rules Committee colleagues to pass and implement this important update to Senate policy," she said. 

The resolution would also require offices to turn over information on who has completed sexual harassment training and pitches change to the Senate's training program including having "practical examples aimed at instructing supervisors in the prevention of harassment, discrimination, and retaliation."

It would also require the Senate's sergeant at arms to develop and conduct an "anonymous survey of Members, officers and employees of the Senate relating to the prevalence of sexual harassment in the Senate during the previous Congress."  
 
In addition to Grassley's previously letter, Gillibrand said late last week that she was working on her own legislation. 

"What you see time and again in institutions all around the country is a culture where power and fear keep sexual assault and sexual harassment in the shadows. Congress is no different. Congress should never be above the law or play by their own set of rules," Gillibrand added on Tuesday.