Senators push mandatory sexual harassment training for members, staff
© Greg Nash

Senators are pushing for changes to the Senate's sexual harassment policy, including making training mandatory.

Sens. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyFormer US attorneys urge support for Trump nominee Dem leaders request bipartisan meeting on Russia probe Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — House passes 'right to try' drug bill | Trump moves to restrict abortion referrals MORE (R-Iowa), Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinFormer US attorneys urge support for Trump nominee The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — Republicans see some daylight in midterm polling Senate panel clears bill to bolster probes of foreign investment deals MORE (D-Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSenators introduce bill to overhaul sexual harassment policy Senate reaches deal on new sexual harassment policy Washington governor to make Iowa debut MORE (D-Minn.), Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstSenate GOP urges Trump administration to work closely with Congress on NAFTA Overnight Defense: Trump aide's comment mocking McCain sparks outrage | Haspel gets another 'no' vote | Pompeo floats North Korea aid for denuclearization Overnight Energy: Poll finds majority oppose Trump offshore drilling plan | Senators say Trump endorsed ethanol deal | Automaker group wants to keep increasing efficiency standards MORE (R-Iowa), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandSenators near deal on sexual harassment policy change Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — Trump hits federally funded clinics with new abortion restrictions Dem senators ask drug companies to list prices in ads MORE (D-N.Y.), Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoPa. health secretary: 'Sustainable funding' needed to attack opioid crisis Senate panel unanimously approves water infrastructure bill The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — How long can a Trump-DOJ accord survive? MORE (R-W.Va.), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — House passes 'right to try' drug bill | Trump moves to restrict abortion referrals House approves 'right to try,' sends bill to Trump's desk Senate GOP urges Trump administration to work closely with Congress on NAFTA MORE (R-Wis.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerProgressive rise is good news for Sanders, Warren Clinton backs Georgia governor hopeful on eve of primary Maybe a Democratic mayor should be president MORE (D-N.J.) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — VA reform bill heads to Trump's desk Senators introduce bill to measure progress in opioid fight Dems win nail-biter in charity congressional soccer game MORE (R-Alaska) introduced a resolution on Tuesday to require members, staff, interns, fellows and detailees to complete the training.

The resolution calls for the Senate Rules Committee to issue rules for sexual harassment training, including requiring training within 60 days once a member or Senate staffer starts their position, and would also give 60 days for anyone who has not previously undergone training to complete it.

"Today, I’m introducing a bipartisan resolution to ensure that the Rules Committee has the authority necessary to ensure that every member of this chamber, every employee on the Senate payroll, and every unpaid Senate intern receives anti-harassment training," Grassley said in a prepared statement.

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Grassley previously asked the Rules Committee, overseen by Klobuchar and Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyMcConnell tells senators he might scrap August recess Trump's plan to claw back spending hits wall in Congress Frustrated Trump wants action on border wall, immigration MORE (R-Ala.), to make training mandatory, but was told that the Senate would likely need to pass a resolution giving them that authority.

Klobuchar reiterated that she believes sexual harassment training should be mandatory. 
 “I look forward to working with Senator Grassley and my Rules Committee colleagues to pass and implement this important update to Senate policy," she said. 

The resolution would also require offices to turn over information on who has completed sexual harassment training and pitches change to the Senate's training program including having "practical examples aimed at instructing supervisors in the prevention of harassment, discrimination, and retaliation."

It would also require the Senate's sergeant at arms to develop and conduct an "anonymous survey of Members, officers and employees of the Senate relating to the prevalence of sexual harassment in the Senate during the previous Congress."  
 
In addition to Grassley's previously letter, Gillibrand said late last week that she was working on her own legislation. 

"What you see time and again in institutions all around the country is a culture where power and fear keep sexual assault and sexual harassment in the shadows. Congress is no different. Congress should never be above the law or play by their own set of rules," Gillibrand added on Tuesday.