Senators push mandatory sexual harassment training for members, staff
© Greg Nash

Senators are pushing for changes to the Senate's sexual harassment policy, including making training mandatory.

Sens. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyArchivist rejects Democrats' demand for Kavanaugh documents Kavanaugh recommended against Clinton indictment in 1998: report Russian meddling on social media happens on both the right and left MORE (R-Iowa), Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinArchivist rejects Democrats' demand for Kavanaugh documents Senate Judiciary announces Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing Latino legal group slams Kavanaugh MORE (D-Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharHillicon Valley: FBI fires Strzok after anti-Trump tweets | Trump signs defense bill with cyber war policy | Google under scrutiny over location data | Sinclair's troubles may just be beginning | Tech to ease health data access | Netflix CFO to step down House Intel lawmakers introduce bipartisan election security bill Election Countdown: Takeaways from too-close-to-call Ohio special election | Trump endorsements cement power but come with risks | GOP leader's race now rated as 'toss-up' | Record numbers of women nominated | Latino candidates get prominent role in 2020 MORE (D-Minn.), Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstSenators introduce bill to change process to levy national security tariffs Overnight Defense: Pompeo spars with senators at hearing | Trump, Putin meeting won't happen until next year | Pentagon was caught off guard by White House on Syria Andrew Wheeler must reverse damage to American heartland MORE (R-Iowa), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandDemocrats embracing socialism is dangerous for America Border patrol chief: Calls to abolish ICE impact the morale of my team Kamala Harris tied with Bernie Sanders as betting favorite for 2020 Dems MORE (D-N.Y.), Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoSenate GOP battles for leverage with House on spending Lawmakers, media team up for charity tennis event The Hill's Morning Report — Trump picks new fight with law enforcement, intelligence community MORE (R-W.Va.), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonWhen it comes to drone tech, wildfire officials need the rights tools for the job GOP chairman readies Steele dossier subpoenas Republican questions CBP’s release of man wanted on murder warrant MORE (R-Wis.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDemocrats embracing socialism is dangerous for America Kavanaugh recommended against Clinton indictment in 1998: report Kavanaugh once said president would likely have to testify before grand jury if subpoenaed: report MORE (D-N.J.) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiAlaska fishermen worry Trump tariffs will be ‘devastating’ to seafood industry Senate Judiciary announces Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing NRA will spend M to support Kavanaugh for Supreme Court: report MORE (R-Alaska) introduced a resolution on Tuesday to require members, staff, interns, fellows and detailees to complete the training.

The resolution calls for the Senate Rules Committee to issue rules for sexual harassment training, including requiring training within 60 days once a member or Senate staffer starts their position, and would also give 60 days for anyone who has not previously undergone training to complete it.

"Today, I’m introducing a bipartisan resolution to ensure that the Rules Committee has the authority necessary to ensure that every member of this chamber, every employee on the Senate payroll, and every unpaid Senate intern receives anti-harassment training," Grassley said in a prepared statement.

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Grassley previously asked the Rules Committee, overseen by Klobuchar and Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyRand Paul delivers Putin letter from Trump Senators privately met foreign allies to reassure them of NATO support Senate clears 4B ‘minibus’ spending measure MORE (R-Ala.), to make training mandatory, but was told that the Senate would likely need to pass a resolution giving them that authority.

Klobuchar reiterated that she believes sexual harassment training should be mandatory. 
 “I look forward to working with Senator Grassley and my Rules Committee colleagues to pass and implement this important update to Senate policy," she said. 

The resolution would also require offices to turn over information on who has completed sexual harassment training and pitches change to the Senate's training program including having "practical examples aimed at instructing supervisors in the prevention of harassment, discrimination, and retaliation."

It would also require the Senate's sergeant at arms to develop and conduct an "anonymous survey of Members, officers and employees of the Senate relating to the prevalence of sexual harassment in the Senate during the previous Congress."  
 
In addition to Grassley's previously letter, Gillibrand said late last week that she was working on her own legislation. 

"What you see time and again in institutions all around the country is a culture where power and fear keep sexual assault and sexual harassment in the shadows. Congress is no different. Congress should never be above the law or play by their own set of rules," Gillibrand added on Tuesday.