Senators introduce gun safety bill after Florida shooting
© Greg Nash

A bipartisan group of senators is introducing gun safety legislation aimed at bolstering information-sharing between federal and state law enforcement following the Parkland, Fla., mass shooting.

The bill, known as "lie and try" legislation, would require federal officials to notify state law enforcement within 24 hours of when an individual prohibited from buying a gun tries to purchase a firearm and fails their background check. 

"By ensuring that state and federal law enforcement are working together to prevent those who shouldn’t be able to buy a gun from getting one, we can make our communities safer," Sen. Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsHillicon Valley: Trump hits China with massive tech tariffs | Facebook meets with GOP leaders over bias allegations | Judge sends Manafort to jail ahead of trial | AT&T completes Time Warner purchase Dem senator: Trump Jr. may have given 'false testimony' about meeting with foreign nationals Overnight Finance: House sends Dodd-Frank rollbacks to Trump | What's in the bill | Trump says there is 'no deal' to help ZTE | Panel approves bill to toughen foreign investment reviews MORE (D-Del.) said in a statement. 

ADVERTISEMENT
Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyOvernight Defense: Pick for South Korean envoy splits with Trump on nuclear threat | McCain blasts move to suspend Korean military exercises | White House defends Trump salute of North Korean general WH backpedals on Trump's 'due process' remark on guns Top GOP candidate drops out of Ohio Senate race MORE (R-Pa.) added that lying about your background when trying to purchase a gun is "a federal felony and it goes almost entirely unprosecuted now." 

Florida Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioHillicon Valley: Supreme Court takes up Apple case | Senate votes to block ZTE deal | Officials testify on Clinton probe report | Russia's threat to undersea cables | Trump tells Pentagon to create 'space force' | FCC begins T-Mobile, Sprint deal review Feehery: Betting on Trump Senate votes to block Trump's ZTE deal MORE (R) and Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonHillicon Valley: Supreme Court takes up Apple case | Senate votes to block ZTE deal | Officials testify on Clinton probe report | Russia's threat to undersea cables | Trump tells Pentagon to create 'space force' | FCC begins T-Mobile, Sprint deal review Overnight Defense: Trump directs Pentagon to create 'Space Force' | Lawmakers say new branch needs their approval | Senate passes 6B defense policy bill | Pentagon suspends planning for 'war game' with South Korea Overnight Health Care — Presented by the Association of American Medical Colleges — Governors criticize Trump move on pre-existing conditions MORE (D) — who have been in the national spotlight since last month's shooting, as well as Sens. John CornynJohn CornynTrump plan to claw back billion in spending in peril Trump digs in amid uproar on zero tolerance policy Amendments fuel resentments within Senate GOP MORE (R-Texas), Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthDem senators move to halt potential US troop withdrawal from S. Korea Dems accuse Interior of holding up key grants Five things to watch for at the US-North Korea summit MORE (D-Ill.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump digs in amid uproar on zero tolerance policy Senate passes 6B defense bill Justice IG says report doesn’t assess ‘credibility’ of Russian probe MORE (R-S.C.) and Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillManchin becomes final Democrat to back bill preventing separation of immigrant families Dem poll: McCaskill leads by 6 in Missouri Senate race The Hill's Morning Report — Can the economy help Republicans buck political history in 2018? MORE (D-Mo.), are also backing the legislation. 

Flagging the attempted purchases, according to the senators, would allow state officials to investigate and potentially prosecute the individuals, as well as "keep an eye on" potential future criminal activity. 

The legislation also requires the Department of Justice to publish an annual report with statistics about its prosecution of background check denial cases. 

"The NICS (National Instant Background Check System) Denial Notification Act would not only require federal authorities to flag background check denials for state-level authorities, it would also hold these federal officials accountable," Rubio said in a statement. 

The legislation comes in the wake of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where 17 people were killed.

Despite pressure from Trump and Florida students, who have blanketed the media since the shooting, Congress's guns debate appears to have stalled. 

Lawmakers have introduced, or floated, a flurry of new legislation after the shooting. But none of the bills appear to yet have the 60 votes needed to pass the Senate or majority support in the House.