Feinstein: Trump 'completely caved' to gun lobby
© Greg Nash

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump, Putin meet under cloud of Mueller’s Russia indictments Dems launch pressure campaign over migrant families California Dems endorse progressive challenger over Feinstein MORE (D-Calif.) on Monday ripped President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says he doesn't want to use 'adversary' to describe Russia Comey urges Americans to vote for Democrats in midterms Roby wins Alabama GOP runoff, overcoming blowback from Trump criticism MORE’s plan to "harden" schools against armed attacks, saying he "caved" and his pledge to back tougher gun laws is “hollow.”

“President Trump has completely caved to the gun lobby. … To no one’s surprise, the president’s words of support for stronger gun safety laws proved to be hollow,” Feinstein said.

The White House unveiled its school and gun safety proposals on Sunday in response to a Florida shooting, including an effort to “harden” schools as targets and providing assistance to states to arm teachers.

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The proposal did not call for comprehensive background checks for gun purchases or to raise the age to buy a rifle from 18 to 21 — two positions Trump previously indicated he supported.

Feinstein added on Monday that arming teachers is “an utterly ridiculous idea” and accused Trump of aligning his priorities with ideas endorsed by the gun lobby.

“Responding to the murder of 17 students and educators by endorsing the gun lobby’s platform is a shameful abdication of the president’s responsibility to lead. Shame on you, Mr. President,” Feinstein said.

The White House proposal comes as the debate on Capitol Hill has largely stalemated. The House is expected to vote on a school safety proposal this week, but if, or when, any bill will get a vote in the Senate remains unclear. 

The Senate is currently debating legislation to reform Dodd-Frank financial regulations. Senators are also expected to take up a bill to combat sex trafficking and a mammoth government funding deal before leaving town for two weeks.