McConnell sends warning over nomination votes
© Greg Nash

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's 12:30 Report Republican strategist: Trump is 'driven by ego' Senate GOP campaign arm asking Trump to endorse McSally in Arizona: report MORE (R-Ky.) hinted Monday that he's willing to keep the Senate in town through Friday, or even into the weekend, as Republicans work to confirm a slate of President TrumpDonald John TrumpAl Gore: Trump has had 'less of an impact on environment so far than I feared' Trump claims tapes of him saying the 'n-word' don't exist Trump wanted to require staffers to get permission before writing books: report MORE's nominees. 

"We have a number of nominees to consider in the next several days. ... The Senate's workweek will not end until all of these amply qualified nominees are confirmed," McConnell said from the Senate floor. 
 
Before leaving for the two-week recess that just ended, the GOP leader teed up six nominations. The Senate took up an initial vote on the first in the series, Claria Boom to be a U.S. district judge, on Monday evening. 
 
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A final vote is set for Tuesday. The Senate will then take an initial vote on a National Labor Relations Board nominee. 
 
Under the Senate's rules, after a nominee overcomes an initial vote, known as a cloture vote, senators can still force up to an additional 30 hours of debate. 
 
If opponents drag out the debate clock over the current round of nominations it would allow them to keep the chamber in session through the weekend, well past the normal Thursday exit. 
 
But senators are not using the full 30 hours on Boom and could still agree to speed up the rest of the nominations.
 
McConnell's comments come as Republicans, and the Trump administration, are growing increasingly frustrated by the pace of nomination votes. 
 
"Senate Democrats are using the procedural playbook to obstruct and delay," McConnell said. 
 
Republicans have privately mulled changing the rules to speed up votes on Trump's nominees. 

GOP Sen. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordHillicon Valley: FBI fires Strzok after anti-Trump tweets | Trump signs defense bill with cyber war policy | Google under scrutiny over location data | Sinclair's troubles may just be beginning | Tech to ease health data access | Netflix CFO to step down House Intel lawmakers introduce bipartisan election security bill Trump officials look to neutralize cyber threats in supply chain MORE’s (Okla.) proposal would cut down debate time from 30 hours to eight hours for most nominations once they’ve overcome an initial hurdle that shows they have the simple majority to pass. 

A GOP aide told The Hill that the proposal could see movement in the Senate Rules and Administration Committee in May. Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntGOP senator pushes back on Trump’s attacks on Maxine Waters’s intelligence Pair of DC fundraisers aims to boost McCaskill challenger Kansas City mayoral candidate: Trump is trying to define patriotism MORE (R-Mo.), the next chairman of the committee, predicted the proposal will get a vote, adding that “Republicans have every right to be offended by the way the rules have been abused."