Senate takes symbolic shot at Trump tariffs
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The Senate on Wednesday took a symbolic shot at President TrumpDonald John TrumpNFL players stand in tunnel during anthem, extending protests 12 former top intel officials blast Trump's move to revoke Brennan's security clearance NYT: Omarosa believed to have as many as 200 tapes MORE’s trade policy amid anxiety on Capitol Hill over his tariff strategy.

Senators voted 88-11 to instruct lawmakers hashing out a deal on a government funding bill to include language “providing a role for Congress” on tariffs implemented for national security reasons, known as Section 232 of the trade laws.

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The vote is nonbinding, meaning lawmakers don’t have to add trade language into the funding bill. But the vote margin, with more senators supporting it than the amount needed to override a veto, underscores the depth of concern on Capitol Hill.

“I think it’s significant that, as many of us have discussed with the president and his Cabinet, that there’s some anxiety about ... tariffs,” Senate Majority Whip John CornynJohn CornynTop Senate Intel Dem: Trump compiling a 'Nixonian enemies list' It’s possible to protect national security without jeopardizing the economy Archivist rejects Democrats' demand for Kavanaugh documents MORE (R-Texas) told The Hill. “I think it’s just a way to make that point.”

Trump’s trade policies have sparked backlash from lawmakers.

The president used Section 232 to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, including slapping the financial penalties on key trading allies like the European Union, Canada and Mexico.

But Republicans have been wary of using legislation to push back against Trump months before the midterm elections.

Senate Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerVoters will punish Congress for ignoring duty on war and peace GOP senator reviving effort to rein in Trump on tariffs Trump draws bipartisan fire over Brennan MORE (R-Tenn.) tried to attach legislation requiring congressional approval for tariffs applied for national security reasons to both a defense policy bill and the farm bill, but was blocked both times.

Corker said after the vote that he would keep pressing for the Senate to pass stand-alone legislation on Trump's tariff authority. 

"I believe support for our legislation will only grow. We will continue to push for a binding vote and are hopeful one will be scheduled in the near future," Corker said in a statement. 

Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) — who was opposing Trump's appeals court judges over the tariff fight — added that Congress has "to rein in abuse of presidential authority and restore Congress’ constitutional authority in this regard.”

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchDem lawmaker calls Trump racist in response to 'dog' comment PETA calls out Trump for attacking Omarosa as a 'dog' Hatch 'not comfortable' with Trump calling Omarosa a 'dog' MORE (R-Utah) has said he will bring up tariff legislation in the committee. Some GOP senators on the panel have voiced support for narrowing Section 232 of the trade law.

Trump allies have warned lawmakers from passing legislation, arguing it would undercut the president’s negotiating ability.

Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.) knocked senators shortly before the vote, saying they were tying Trump’s hands.

“I just don’t understand why this body continues to try to tie the hands of this president at every turn," he said. "This president is committed to creating a more level playing field for our workers and our companies here at home to compete.” 

Perdue was one of 11 Republican senators who voted no. GOP Sens. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoOvernight Energy: Trump EPA to defend Obama smog rule | Wheeler gets warmer welcome before Senate | Animal rights groups sue Interior over pro-hunting council EPA’s Wheeler gets warmer welcome at Senate hearing Trump has no plans to endorse in Tennessee GOP governor's race: report MORE (Wyo.), Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoSenate GOP battles for leverage with House on spending Lawmakers, media team up for charity tennis event The Hill's Morning Report — Trump picks new fight with law enforcement, intelligence community MORE (W.Va.), Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoIt’s possible to protect national security without jeopardizing the economy Tougher Russia sanctions face skepticism from Senate Republicans On The Money: Trump floats steeper tariffs on China | Senate GOP battles for leverage with House on spending | Trump asked Treasury to look into capital gains tax cut | Senate clears 4B 'minibus' spending measure MORE (Idaho), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziBudget chairs press appropriators on veterans spending Forcing faith-based agencies out of the system is a disservice to women Senate takes symbolic shot at Trump tariffs MORE (Wyo.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham: Flynn should lose security clearance Press needs to restore its credibility on FBI and Justice Department Trump, Obamas and Clintons among leaders mourning Aretha Franklin MORE (S.C.), Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerThe farm bill gives Congress a chance to act on the Pet and Women Safety (PAWS) Act GOP’s midterm strategy takes shape Battle of the billionaires drives Nevada contest MORE (Nev.), Cindy Hyde-Smith (Miss.), James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofePence announces first steps in establishing 'Space Force' EPA chief: Obama car rule rollback would save consumers 0B EPA’s Wheeler gets warmer welcome at Senate hearing MORE (Okla.), Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischGOP senators introduce resolution endorsing ICE Senate takes symbolic shot at Trump tariffs GOP lawmaker presses Bolton to examine Obama administration's response to Russian cyberattacks MORE (Idaho) and Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottTim Scott says former intern shot in Chicago is recovering Tim Scott: Trump has taken steps 'to move us in a better direction' since Charlottesville Sunday shows preview: Virginia lawmakers talk Charlottesville, anniversary protests MORE (S.C.) also voted no. 

Updated at 1:41 p.m.