In its last roll-call vote of the year, the House on Thursday easily passed a $607 billion defense bill from House and Senate negotiators.

Members voted 350-69 for the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), sending it to the Senate to consider next week. The "no" votes came from 19 Republicans and 50 Democrats.

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The bill was put together just days ago after it became clear that the Senate would not be able to move quickly enough to pass its own version. The Senate had become hung up on requests to consider dozens of amendments on issues, including sexual assault in the military, Iran and ObamaCare.

The final version bypasses the normal process of considering amendments in the Senate, followed by a House-Senate conference committee. But members of both parties urged support for the bill.

"This legislation pays our troops and their families," said House Armed Services Committee Chairman Buck McKeon (R-Calif.). "It keeps our Navy fleet sailing and military aircraft flying. It maintains a strong nuclear deterrent."

"It is critical to national security and critical to supporting our troops," ranking member Adam SmithDavid (Adam) Adam SmithOvernight Defense: Latest on scrapped Korea summit | North Korea still open to talks | Pentagon says no change in military posture | House passes 6B defense bill | Senate version advances House easily passes 7B defense authorization bill Overnight Defense: Over 500 amendments proposed for defense bill | Measures address transgender troops, Yemen war | Trump taps acting VA chief as permanent secretary MORE (D-Wash.) agreed. "To not pass this at this point is to jeopardize national security and to not support our troops."

House and Senate Armed Services leaders have urged Congress to pass the bill — which has been signed into law 51 years in a row — before the end of the year.

There is resistance among some Senate Republicans over proceeding on the bill without amendments, however — including from Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell sees Ohio in play as confidence about midterms grows   Giuliani: White House wants briefing on classified meeting over Russia probe GOP senators introduce Trump's plan to claw back billion in spending MORE (R-Ky.).

McConnell has accused Reid of trying to duck a vote on tougher Iran sanctions, and Republicans say they're concerned Reid will not give them one with a standalone bill.

Sen. Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnMr. President, let markets help save Medicare Pension insolvency crisis only grows as Congress sits on its hands Paul Ryan should realize that federal earmarks are the currency of cronyism MORE (R-Okla.), who wants to vote on Pentagon audits, has also said he might block the bill if no amendments can be offered.

Senate Armed Services Chairman Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinHow House Republicans scrambled the Russia probe Congress dangerously wields its oversight power in Russia probe The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by CVS Health — Trump’s love-hate relationship with the Senate MORE (D-Mich.) and ranking member James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeFive takeaways on the canceled Trump summit with Kim Senate panel unanimously approves water infrastructure bill Defense bill moves forward with lawmakers thinking about McCain MORE (R-Okla.) argued that the Defense bill must be passed this year, warning that important provisions, like special pay bonuses for troops, expire on Dec. 31.

Inhofe acknowledged Thursday that some of his colleague will opposed the bill over the amendment process, but he predicted half of Senate Republicans will ultimately support moving forward.

“The defense bill is different than all other bills,” Inhofe said. “It’s the one bill that you have to have to give the recourses to our kids who are out fighting battles, and so it has to be treated differently. That has to have priority over process.”

Several other Armed Services Republicans have also indicated they plan to support the Defense bill, even if they are upset about not getting to consider amendments.

“It’s disgraceful, this whole situation,” said Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTo woo black voters in Georgia, Dems need to change their course of action Senate panel again looks to force Trump’s hand on cyber warfare strategy Senate panel advances 6B defense policy bill MORE (R-Ariz.), who has blasted Reid’s handling of the bill but will support moving forward with it.

Sen. Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteThe Hill's Morning Report: Koch Network re-evaluating midterm strategy amid frustrations with GOP Audit finds US Defense Department wasted hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars US sends A-10 squadron to Afghanistan for first time in three years MORE (R-N.H.) also said she would be supporting the Defense bill when it’s on the floor next week.

The bill authorizes $607 billion in spending for the Department of Defense: $526.8 billion in base spending, and $80.7 billion on war funding for Afghanistan.

This year, many members focused on the need to improve the handling of sexual assault cases in the military, after reports that the number of these cases has increased. The final bill does not include language taking these cases out of the chain of normal military command, as some amendments demanded. However, it does prevent commanders from overturning guilty verdicts.

The measure also requires mandatory discharges for people found guilty of the assaults, and adds new victim protections during the pre-trial process.

On Guantánamo detainees, the bill prohibits a transfer of these prisoners to the United States, but eases restrictions on transfers to other overseas destinations.