The Senate on Thursday rejected Sen. John CornynJohn CornynRand's reversal advances Pompeo Joe Scarborough predicts Trump won't run in 2020 Republicans divided over legislation protecting Mueller MORE’s (R-Texas) immigration reform bill amendment that would have put mandatory border security triggers in place before immigrants were given legal status.

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The Senate voted 54-43 to table the amendment, which was seen as crucial to get more Republican support for the legislation. But Sens. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenLobbying World Worried GOP views Trump trade war with angst Conservatives fear trade war could cripple tax cuts message MORE (R-N.D.) and Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerRand's reversal advances Pompeo Overnight Defense: Pompeo clears Senate panel, on track for confirmation | Retired officers oppose Haspel for CIA director | Iran, Syria on agenda for Macron visit Pompeo headed for confirmation after surprise panel vote MORE (R-Tenn.) are expected to release an alternative border security enforcement amendment later Thursday.

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioFormer Florida congressmen mull bipartisan gubernatorial run: report Winners and losers from Jim Bridenstine’s confirmation as NASA administrator GOP Senate candidates trade barbs in brutal Indiana primary MORE (R-Fla.) split with his fellow GOP Gang of Eight members by voting against tabling Cornyn's amendment, while Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainManchin, Donnelly back Pompeo This week: Senate barrels toward showdown over Pompeo Romney forced into GOP primary for Utah Senate nomination MORE (Ariz.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamOvernight Cybersecurity: Senators eye path forward on election security bill | Facebook isn't winning over privacy advocates | New hacks target health care Paul backs Pompeo, clearing path for confirmation Can Silicon Valley expect European-style regulation here at home? MORE (S.C.) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeWinners and losers from Jim Bridenstine’s confirmation as NASA administrator Manchin, Donnelly back Pompeo Juan Williams: GOP support for Trump begins to crack MORE (Ariz.) voted to kill Cornyn's amendment. 

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulRand's reversal advances Pompeo Overnight Defense: Pompeo clears Senate panel, on track for confirmation | Retired officers oppose Haspel for CIA director | Iran, Syria on agenda for Macron visit After Dems stood against Pompeo, Senate’s confirmation process needs a revamp MORE (R-Ky.) also voted to table the amendment. Democratic Sens. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinRand's reversal advances Pompeo West Virginia GOP Senate candidate says he’d like to waterboard opioid dealers Overnight Health Care: Teen pregnancy program to focus on abstinence | Insurers warn against short-term health plan proposal | Trump VA pick faces tough sell MORE (W.Va.) and Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.) voted in support of considering Cornyn's amendment.

Cornyn’s "Results" amendment would have required that the border enforcement standards in the underlying Gang of Eight bill be met before anyone could be granted permanent legal status.

“My amendment is designed to turn border security rhetoric into reality. More specifically it would have a trigger,” Cornyn said ahead of the vote Thursday. 

“The difference between my amendment and their bill is that their bill promises the sun and the moon when it comes to border security but it has no trigger mechanism.”

The Senate bill under consideration sets the goals of 100 percent border-monitoring capabilities and a 90 percent apprehension rate of illegal entrants along the Southern border, but does not require the Department of Homeland Security to have them in place before granting permanent legal residency. Cornyn’s amendment would have made those goals mandatory. 

“My amendment realigns all of the incentives for people across the political spectrum to make sure that the federal government and bureaucracies keep their commitment,” Cornyn said.

Cornyn’s amendment also would have required the DHS to have a biometric entry-exit system fully operational before anyone is given legal status.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyCongress should build on the momentum from spending bill Overnight Tech: Zuckerberg grilled by lawmakers over data scandal | What we learned from marathon hearing | Facebook hit with class action lawsuit | Twitter endorses political ad disclosure bill | Uber buys bike share Overnight Cybersecurity: Zuckerberg faces grilling in marathon hearing | What we learned from Facebook chief | Dems press Ryan to help get Russia hacking records | Top Trump security adviser resigning MORE (D-Vt.) criticized Cornyn's amendment for being "unrealistic," and said it would delay the path to citizenship for years. Leahy added that most of the amendment was "bad" because it would increase the cost of the bill by billions of dollars.

The Senate is considering the Border Security, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Modernization Act. 

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidAfter Dems stood against Pompeo, Senate’s confirmation process needs a revamp GOP poised to advance rules change to speed up Trump nominees Dems walk tightrope on Pompeo nomination MORE (D-Nev.) said he hoped the vote to table Cornyn’s amendment would help produce an agreement to vote on more amendments Thursday. He has also said he wants work completed on the bill by the July 4 recess, even if that means weekend votes.

The bipartisan group of eight senators, known as the Gang of Eight, introduced S. 744, which would create a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants already in the country, toughen border security, create a guest-worker program and boost high-skilled immigration.

Republicans have complained that the legislation would provide amnesty in 13 years for the nearly 11 million illegal residents before strengthening border enforcement. Several GOP amendments on border security enforcement have been defeated.

On Wednesday, the Senate tabled an amendment from Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) that would have required Congress to vote on border security measures before legal status was granted.

More than 200 amendments have been files, but only 12 have been considered.