Hollywood’s giddy love affair with the White House and Capitol Hill is over for another year, after a weekend in which President Obama and the stars of politics rubbed elbows with the celebrities of film, TV and sports.

The weekend’s stars were Joel McHale, the acerbic “Talk Soup” star picked to host the festivities, President Obama and Julia Louis-Dreyfus, who was a ubiquitous presence at the parties, breakfasts and the main event — a dinner marking the 100th anniversary of the White House Correspondents’ Association.

That’s not to say they were all winners.

McHale’s jokes at the expense of ObamaCare, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGOP rushes to cut ties to Moore Papadopoulos was in regular contact with Stephen Miller, helped edit Trump speech: report Bannon jokes Clinton got her ‘ass kicked’ in 2016 election MORE, among others, received a mixed reception from an over-packed house at the Washington Hilton.

Several uncomfortable murmurs could be heard in the crowd as McHale joked about how the night, like Christie’s presidential prospects, would be over quickly and whether it would be appropriate to give grandfather-to-be Bill ClintonBill ClintonTop Oversight Dem pushes back on Uranium One probe Bill Clinton hits Trump, tax reform plan in Georgetown speech The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE a cigar.

“Newsroom” star Olivia Munn said McHale “killed it” on Twitter, but some of the other online reviews were considerably less kind. People magazine’s critic called it a mess and compared it to Seth McFarlane’s disastrous hosting of the Oscars.

DeadlineHollywood.com opined that the comic actor “stumbled and stuttered through a routine that got more moans and groans from the packed Washington Hilton ballroom than laughs.”

President Obama’s speech won better reviews, as did a video sketch in which Louis-Dreyfus, playing her fictional vice presidential character from “Veep,” palled around with real-life Vice President Biden. [READ OBAMA's REMARKS.]

The two wrote positive headlines for Biden in The Washington Post and The Hill, got tattoos with Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and were caught eating ice cream in the White House by a disapproving first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaMichelle Obama: We raise men to feel 'entitled' Michelle Obama: 'Don't tweet every thought' Michelle Obama, Prince Harry visit public school in Chicago MORE — who stole a scoop herself after kicking the two out of the kitchen, and then justified herself by noting there were raisins in it.

Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerThe two-party system is dying — let’s put it out of its misery One year later, neither party can get past last year's election White House strikes back at Bushes over legacy MORE (R-Ohio) poked fun at himself, too, telling Louis-Dreyfus he was too busy to attend the dinner as he watched the “panda cam” from his office.

The video encapsulated the annual weekend in Washington, during which Hollywood takes over the Capitol and reporters, politicians, and administration and Capitol Hill staffers rush out to take selfies with the stars.

The frivolity has earned the dinner some criticism, with many questioning the appropriateness of an event that exemplifies a coziness between journalists and the people they cover. The New York Times has boycotted the dinner for several years and NBC News veteran Tom Brokaw has been among those raising concerns.

This year, some critics, including bestselling author of This Town Mark Leibovich, set up shop for a discussion about media ethics in the Hilton on the night of the dinner. But, tellingly, no one else showed up. “Well, maybe next year we’ll get someone,” Leibovich tweeted.

The number of parties that take place across the weekend has multiplied.

The Hill’s party, held in conjunction with “Entertainment Tonight” at the Canadian Embassy in downtown Washington, drew stars, including actress and model Brooklyn Decker, “Scandal” actress Darby Stanchfield and former “American Idol” contestant Katharine McPhee.

Among the lawmakers who were there were Sens. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinDems mull big changes after Brazile bombshell A bipartisan bridge opens between the House and Senate Collins, Manchin to serve as No Labels co-chairs MORE (D-W.Va.) and Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntWe must fund community health centers now Overnight Tech: Senators demand tech firms do more on Russian meddling | House Intel releases Russian-promoted ads | Apple CEO says 'fake news' bigger threat than ads | Ex-Yahoo CEO, Equifax execs to testify on breaches Facebook: Clinton, Trump campaigns spent a combined M on ads MORE (R-Mo.), and Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Chairman Steve Israel (N.Y.).

The Hill party also drew a number of high-profile media figures, including ABC News’s Claire Shipman (accompanied by her husband, White House press secretary Jay Carney), and Ed Henry, Greta Van Susteren and Brett Baier, all of Fox News Channel.

The weekend threw up plenty of celebrity gossip and somewhat incongruous moments.

Backstage at the Hilton on the night of the dinner, “Duck Dynasty” stars Willie and Korie Robertson posed for photos close to Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenLobbying World Overnight Regulation: House to vote on repealing joint-employer rule | EPA won't say which areas don't meet Obama smog rule | Lawmakers urge regulators to reject Perry plan New tax plan will hinder care for older Americans MORE (D-Ore.). When Wyden was asked if he too would try to get photos with the duo, he laughed and said, “I’m going to pass on the selfies tonight.”

At a party hosted by Netflix and Google on Friday, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) complimented Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidTop Lobbyists 2017: Grass roots Boehner confronted Reid after criticism from Senate floor GOP in uncharted territory rolling back rules through resolutions MORE (D-Nev.), with a reference to Kevin Spacey’s character in “House of Cards.”

“Harry Reid is awesome. He’s a master at work, and he is on the level,”

Pelosi said. “I don’t think [Frank] Underwood is on the level, [although] I love Kevin Spacey.”

Another “House of Cards” star showed up at the Creative Coalition’s dinner. Constance Zimmer, who plays White House correspondent Janine Skorsky told The Hill, “I got to tell you, I love representing you guys. I love representing real people.”

While the weekend is a generally light-hearted affair, serious politics in the broadest sense is never entirely off the table.

Reggie Love, the former Duke University basketball player who went on to serve as “body man” for President Obama, endorsed the NBA’s approach to the recent racist comments by Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling.

Love told The Hill that Commissioner Adam Silver had “delivered the right message.”

“Glee” actor Matthew Morrison enthused about the possibility of a Hillary Clinton presidency during a Friday night party hosted by his manager, Eric Podwall.

“Individually and as a family, they are such an amazing unit,” Morrison told The Hill, referring to the Clintons. “I’m a huge fan of Bill Clinton, and I think having [Hillary] as president and having him in her corner is going to be a huge thing for us.”

“Star Trek” actor Sir Patrick Stewart is also firmly in the Clinton camp, though, as a British citizen, he is not eligible to vote in U.S. elections.

“I have been for a long time a really big supporter of Hillary. I think she’s outstanding,” Stewart said.

Some big stars who have attended dinners in the past, such as George Clooney and Scarlett Johansson, weren’t in town this year.

But there were still plenty of celebrities to see, including actresses Lupita Nyong’o, Mindy Kaling, Sofia Vergara and Taylor Schilling, and NFL stars Richard Sherman and Tim Tebow.

Stars from shows about Washington, which have become increasingly popular in recent years, were also all about town.

Most of the cast of “Veep,” showed up, along with the stars of “Scandal” and “House of Cards,” three shows that highlight how Washington’s obsession with Hollywood is increasingly a mutual affair.

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