'Will on the Hill' pokes fun at 2016 politics
© Greg Nash

Wherefore art thou, members of Congress?

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On Tuesday night, you could find many of them taking the stage at the packed Shakespeare Theatre Company in Washington and yukking it up in the annual “Will on the Hill” benefit performance.

Lawmakers, including Reps. Dina Titus (D-Nev.), Ted Deutch (D-Fla.), Michael Grimm (R-N.Y.) and Sen. Roger WickerRoger WickerTrump Navy secretary nominee moves forward to Senate vote 355-ship Navy not a must under Trump's secretary nominee GOP senator: 'Everybody wants to get to yes' on healthcare MORE (R-Miss.), shared the stage with members of the press and professional actors, such as “Mad Men's” Harry Hamlin, to perform “Lend Me Your Ears.”

The plot centered around a leading candidate in the presidential primary, who ran his campaign without any publicity. Set on Super Tuesday, the identity of the candidate is a mystery. The campaign visits a small town, where a festival celebrating Shakespeare's 450th birthday is being held.

The script chided both sides of the aisle and various government agencies, ranging from outgoing House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric CantorSpecial interests hide behind vets on Independence Day What to watch for in Comey’s testimony Trump nominates two new DOD officials MORE (R-Va.) to the Department of Veterans Affairs.

During one bit, a superPAC tried to bribe or ahem, influence, the presidential candidate's top aide. The superPAC's name? The Americans for an American Future for America (AFAAFFA for short, natch).

Another bit focused on the the candidate's family members running a public campaign for healthy eating and regular exercise — a la Michelle ObamaMichelle ObamaVideo surfaces of Michelle Obama at Beyonce’s birthday party Budowsky: Dems need council of war The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE’s “Let’s Move!” initiative — but were getting worn out.

“They're making me eat kale. And drink kale,” the candidate's wife said. “It's just too much!”

Playing the candidate's campaign manager, Hamlin mocked one former commander-in-chief’s newfound passion, quipping, “You're my assistant – which is like saying that George W. Bush is a painter.”

The actors also got in a jab at posturing for the upcoming presidential race: “The results of the midterms remain to be seen, but it's not to early to compete for 2016!”

Other members who made cameos included Reps. Suzanne BonamiciSuzanne BonamiciGore wishes Mikulski a happy birthday at 'Inconvenient Sequel' premiere Dems to Mattis: Don't delay transgender enlistment policy Washingtonians take center stage at Will on the Hill MORE (D-Ore.), Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.), Jim McDermottJim McDermottLobbying World Dem lawmaker: Israel's accusations start of 'war on the American government' Dem to Trump on House floor: ‘Stop tweeting’ MORE (D-Wash.), Mike McIntyre (D-N.C.), Jim MoranJim MoranBillionaire Trump donor hires lobbyists to help vets Lawmakers: Chaffetz has a point on housing stipend Trump can help farmers by improving two-way trade with Cuba MORE (D-Va.), Jared Polis (D-Colo.), Terri SewellTerri SewellVoter fraud commission starts amid controversy It’s time to restore full power to the Voting Rights Act A guide to the committees: House MORE (D-Ala.), Kevin YoderKevin YoderThe net neutrality fight is also about protecting your privacy online House pushes to require warrants for all emails with appropriations amendment Hillary Clinton looks for her role in midterms MORE (R-Kan.) and Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.).

The Hill’s Managing Editor Bob Cusack and The Washington Post’s Dana Milbank also got in on the Shakespearean action. The Hill served as a media sponsor of the event.

The evening raised more than $450,000 for Shakespeare Theatre's education and outreach programs.