Before Sony Pictures pulled the plug Wednesday on the Dec. 25 release of "The Interview" amid terrorism threats, Seth Rogen told The Hill he had no second thoughts about the movie he co-wrote and directed.

Asked if he regretted focusing the movie around real-life North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, rather than an imaginary dictator, Rogen said, “No, not at all. I think it’s really funny.”

“I’m sure they’ll see it,” Rogen, 32, said at the time of North Korean officials, “and I’m sure they’ll hate it.”

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Since the screening last month in Washington of the comedy — which is about a pair of journalists, played by Rogen and James Franco, who plot to assassinate Kim —  a hacking group called Guardians of Peace stole sensitive data from the movie’s distributor and production company, Sony Pictures, and threatened a 9/11-style attack.

Regal Cinemas, where November’s D.C. screening took place, was among several theater chains that pulled or delayed the premiere of the movie. Regal Entertainment Group said in a statement that it “has decided to delay the opening of the film in our theaters” due to “wavering support of the film” and the “ambiguous nature of any real or perceived security threats.”

Shortly after Regal’s Wednesday announcement, Sony said it wouldn’t release “The Interview” as planned on Christmas Day. In a statement, the company said it was “deeply saddened at this brazen effort to suppress the distribution of a movie.”

“We stand by our filmmakers and their right to free expression and are extremely disappointed by this outcome.”

And while the film’s release appears to be canceled and Franco is now reportedly being trailed by a security guard, only a month ago, Rogen appeared relaxed about the controversial movie.

“It’s silly, it’s not like a serious, political — it’s not like ‘Argo,’ ” Rogen said of his big-screen project as he chugged beers with fans that had won tickets to the top-secret screening via Twitter. While typically celebrities are flanked by handlers and publicists, Rogen was flying solo for the event.

“We didn’t make up anything. It’s all real,” Rogen said, adding that he did “a lot” of research on North Korea.

“We talked to people who did go there. They said it was f--king weird. [That] was kind of the overall vibe: it was weird as hell.”

Rogen said he wouldn’t dream of visiting the so-called Hermit Kingdom, saying with a laugh, “I would not go there now!”