Wicker, Brown, and Whitehouse lose trivia contest to reporters

Four print journalists took the trivia crown from three senators and a former congressman at Thursday's Hotline's 2nd annual Political Pursuit contest.

Roll Call's Shira Toeplitz, Time's Jay Newton Small, Washington Post's Chris Cillizza and veteran political analyst Stu Rothenberg beat last year's winners, Sens. Roger Wicker (R-MS), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), and Sherrod Brown (D-OH) along with ex-Rep. Tom Davis (R-VA).

The contest featured three teams, the old school (print) journalists, the members of Congress (Wicker, Davis, and Brown are pictured here), and a team of broadcast journalists made up of NBC's Chuck Todd, CNN's Dana Bash, ABC's Jonathan Karl and PBS's Judy Woodruff.

Held in the beautiful beaux-arts headquarters of the Daughters of the American Revolution, the rounds were lightening fast, and the trivia was obscure.

Take this multiple-choice stumper:

"Which of the following phrases is not an excerpt from one of Gov. Mark Sanford's (R-S.C.) now-public emails to his mistress, Maria Belen Chapur?"

A) "It was indeed a long day, I am most jealous of your salad..."

B) "I like to rehearse my messages..."

C) "I better stop now lest this really sound like the Thornbirds..."

D) "Afternoon projects had me outside and ... I looked like a homeless person."

The answer? It's B. All the rest are quoted text.

After the first round, the broadcast team had 140 points, the members of Congress, 135, and old school journalists had 135 points.

Questions continued, growing increasingly complex. The order of candidate resignations from a congressional race was a particularly tough one, as was a question about former Rep. Mark Foley's (R-Fla.) AOL screen name.

Ultimately, the print journalists won the evening, edging out the senators by 225 points to 190 points. Broadcast journalists came in at 165.

Here's one more memorable challenge: "Name the New Hampshire town where, in early 2008, then-candidate Hillary Clinton famously broke down in tears during a campaign stop, a move that unexpectedly helped reinvigorate her presidential run.*


*Answer: Portsmouth, N.H. (If you got this one, then you're probably ready for prime time.)