Day in the Life: Rep. David Schweikert (R-Ariz.)

ITK proudly presents a new semi-regular feature, detailing a day in the life of lawmakers and their staff. For our premiere piece, Rep. David Schweikert, 51, describes his caffeine- and Twitter-fueled routine that took place on March 12.

5:30 a.m. Alarm clock. It’s 2:30 a.m. in Arizona. Enough said.

5:40 a.m. Wake up to triple shot of espresso. That’s enough breakfast for me.

6 a.m. Spend over an hour in the morning reading the day’s news, social media feeds and articles on my iPad, and check in to see what the world markets are up to.

8 a.m. Start off the day in the office.

8:30 a.m. Make espressos for staff to ensure sure they are also caffeinated enough to function.

8:45 a.m. Check in with staff to see what’s going on in the world, respond to phone calls, texts, emails, tweets and Facebook posts.

9 a.m. Check fixed income futures. Usually CNBC, Fox Business Network and Bloomberg are on rotation in my office.

9:15 a.m. – 12 p.m. Constantly in and out of constituent meetings, votes, meetings with staff, making more coffee and TV or radio interviews.

11:20 a.m. Check in with staff to see how the day is unfolding, respond to phone calls, texts, emails, tweets and Facebook posts.

11:40 a.m. Make a vanilla cappuccino.

12 p.m. Lunchtime at my desk. Eat microwaveable Trader Joe’s Indian food meals. Or go to the Ethiopian food truck parked near the Hill.

12:15 p.m. Check 10-year Treasury yield.

12:15 p.m. – 3 p.m. Meet with students and families from Arizona that are touring the Capitol, drop in on meetings that my staff has in the office, pop in [on] my neighbors[’] — mostly Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R-S.C.) — offices to bother them, make more coffee.

1:10 p.m. Check in with staff to see how the day is unfolding, respond to phone calls, texts, emails, tweets and Facebook posts.

1:25 p.m. Make another vanilla cappuccino. 

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3 p.m. – 6 p.m. Usually we are voting and debating on the floor through this time. Run back and forth from my office to the House floor to balance votes and meetings.

3:10 p.m. Munch on snacks I bought for the staff from Costco.

3:15 p.m. Tune in before Closing Bell to see the day’s performances.

3:45 p.m. Check in with staff to see how the day is unfolding, respond to phone calls, texts, emails, tweets and Facebook posts.

4:40 p.m. I’m hungry. Rifle through my staff’s desks for dark chocolate. Make note to cover my tracks if I find any.

5 p.m. Unofficial end of the day roundup with staff.

5:15 p.m. Make another vanilla cappuccino.

6:30 p.m. Staff starts to trickle out. Look around to see if they left any chocolate laying [sic] out. Eat it.

6:15 p.m. Stop by dinners or events with other colleagues.

7 p.m. Check in with my wife Joyce and our dog Charlie (#CharlieTakesDC) and our cats.

7:15 p.m. Forward cute pictures my wife sent me of my dog Charlie to anyone who cares. If they don’t I tweet them out, hoping someone else will.

8 p.m. Finally dinner. Go down to the Longworth House Office building’s vending machines. I usually go for the burger.

8:10 p.m. Eat vending machine burger at my desk. Start making calls back to constituents.

8:15 – 9:30 p.m. It’s dinnertime in Arizona. Continue to call constituents back and touch base with those contacting our office who want to speak to me.

9:30 p.m. Feel guilty about only eating vending machine food. Go to the gym.

10:15 p.m. Back from gym, read and prepare for the next day.

11:30 p.m. Bed time. Think about the $6 billion Washington has spent in just 24 hours[’] time.

If you or your boss work at the Capitol and want to be featured in a future “Day in the Life,” tip your ITK columnist at jkurtz@thehill.com.

Photos (top) Rep. David Schweikert/Courtesy: Getty (right) Courtesy: Flickr