Olympia Snowe dishes on book and bipartisanship

The three-term senator, who cited extreme partisanship when announcing she wouldn’t seek reelection last year, said, "We are a representative democracy, and we get the government we demand, and if we value and insist on bipartisanship, we will get it." 

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She added, "I want people to know their voices do make a difference."

When asked by The Hill which lawmakers she would consider examples of politicians who embody a commitment to bipartisanship, she named Maine Sens. Susan CollinsSusan CollinsWhy a power grid attack is a nightmare scenario GOP lawmaker: 'Republicans were wrong’ to block Garland Senate passes broad spending bill with .1B in Zika funds MORE (R) and Angus KingAngus KingSenators to Obama: Make 'timely' call on Afghan troops levels Lawmakers push to elevate Cyber Command in Senate defense bill House, Senate at odds on new authority for cyber war unit MORE (I), as well as Mark WarnerMark WarnerNo time to relax: A digital security commission for the next generation Army posthumously awards female veteran who served as WWII spy The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (D-Va.), and Lisa MurkowskiLisa MurkowskiConservation program at center of energy bill fight Senators float bipartisan wildfire bill Overnight Energy: Lawmakers closing in on chemical safety deal MORE (R-Alaska).

A bevy of former Capitol regulars were eyed at the book party, including former Sens. Trent Lott (R-Miss.), Byron Dorgan (D-N.D.), Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.), and former Reps. Connie Morella (R-Md.) and Mike Castle (R-Del.).  

"We have a lot of former members and some current members who believe that compromise is not a bad word — it is in fact how things get done," Morella told The Hill.  Morella is now the President of the Association of Former Members of Congress. Snowe sits on the board of the association.

Former Mississippi Gov. and Republican National Committee (RNC) Chair Haley Barbour was also spotted at the event. Barbour co-chairs the Bipartisan Policy Center's Immigration Task Force.  

"The eight years I was governor of Mississippi, we had a Democratic majority in the House every day, a Democratic majority in the Senate seven years out of eight — to pass anything I had to get Democratic votes," said Barbour.  

"I'm very accustomed to working in a bipartisan way — that's what I had to do to get things done in Mississippi, and at the end of the day, what you're paid for is getting things done."

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