The three-term senator, who cited extreme partisanship when announcing she wouldn’t seek reelection last year, said, "We are a representative democracy, and we get the government we demand, and if we value and insist on bipartisanship, we will get it." 

ADVERTISEMENT
She added, "I want people to know their voices do make a difference."

When asked by The Hill which lawmakers she would consider examples of politicians who embody a commitment to bipartisanship, she named Maine Sens. Susan CollinsSusan CollinsHealthcare wish lists: What moderates, conservatives want Overnight Healthcare: GOP infighting erupts over bill | How Republican governors could bring down ObamaCare repeal | Schumer asks Trump to meet with Dems GOP infighting erupts over healthcare bill MORE (R) and Angus KingAngus KingElection hacking fears turn heat on Homeland Security Zinke hits Dems for delaying Interior nominees Angus King: I’m sure Flynn will 'appear before the committee one way or another' MORE (I), as well as Mark WarnerMark WarnerOur national parks need updates; Congress can help Overnight Cybersecurity: New questions about 'ransomware' attack | Tensions between NSA chief, Trump over Russia | Senate panel asks states to publicize election hacks Senate panel to get Comey memos: report MORE (D-Va.), and Lisa MurkowskiLisa MurkowskiBudowsky: Rising up vs. TrumpCare Trump: Senate GOP 'very close' to agreement on health bill EPA head faces skeptical senators on budget cuts MORE (R-Alaska).

A bevy of former Capitol regulars were eyed at the book party, including former Sens. Trent Lott (R-Miss.), Byron Dorgan (D-N.D.), Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.), and former Reps. Connie Morella (R-Md.) and Mike Castle (R-Del.).  

"We have a lot of former members and some current members who believe that compromise is not a bad word — it is in fact how things get done," Morella told The Hill.  Morella is now the President of the Association of Former Members of Congress. Snowe sits on the board of the association.

Former Mississippi Gov. and Republican National Committee (RNC) Chair Haley Barbour was also spotted at the event. Barbour co-chairs the Bipartisan Policy Center's Immigration Task Force.  

"The eight years I was governor of Mississippi, we had a Democratic majority in the House every day, a Democratic majority in the Senate seven years out of eight — to pass anything I had to get Democratic votes," said Barbour.  

"I'm very accustomed to working in a bipartisan way — that's what I had to do to get things done in Mississippi, and at the end of the day, what you're paid for is getting things done."