The three-term senator, who cited extreme partisanship when announcing she wouldn’t seek reelection last year, said, "We are a representative democracy, and we get the government we demand, and if we value and insist on bipartisanship, we will get it." 

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She added, "I want people to know their voices do make a difference."

When asked by The Hill which lawmakers she would consider examples of politicians who embody a commitment to bipartisanship, she named Maine Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsDemocrats search for 51st net neutrality vote Overnight Tech: States sue FCC over net neutrality repeal | Senate Dems reach 50 votes on measure to override repeal | Dems press Apple on phone slowdowns, kids' health | New Android malware found Overnight Regulation: Dems claim 50 votes in Senate to block net neutrality repeal | Consumer bureau takes first step to revising payday lending rule | Trump wants to loosen rules on bank loans | Pentagon, FDA to speed up military drug approvals MORE (R) and Angus KingAngus Stanley KingMcConnell to Dems: Don't hold government 'hostage' over DACA Overnight Regulation: Regulators kill Perry plan to help coal, nuke plants | Senate Dems to force net neutrality vote | Maine senators oppose offshore drilling plan | SEC halts trading in digital currency firm Maine senators oppose Trump's offshore drilling plans MORE (I), as well as Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerNSA spying program overcomes key Senate hurdle Dem lawmaker wants briefing on major chip vulnerabilities Week ahead: Tech giants to testify on extremist content MORE (D-Va.), and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSessions torched by lawmakers for marijuana move Calif. Republican attacks Sessions over marijuana policy Trump's executive order on minerals will boost national defense MORE (R-Alaska).

A bevy of former Capitol regulars were eyed at the book party, including former Sens. Trent Lott (R-Miss.), Byron Dorgan (D-N.D.), Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.), and former Reps. Connie Morella (R-Md.) and Mike Castle (R-Del.).  

"We have a lot of former members and some current members who believe that compromise is not a bad word — it is in fact how things get done," Morella told The Hill.  Morella is now the President of the Association of Former Members of Congress. Snowe sits on the board of the association.

Former Mississippi Gov. and Republican National Committee (RNC) Chair Haley Barbour was also spotted at the event. Barbour co-chairs the Bipartisan Policy Center's Immigration Task Force.  

"The eight years I was governor of Mississippi, we had a Democratic majority in the House every day, a Democratic majority in the Senate seven years out of eight — to pass anything I had to get Democratic votes," said Barbour.  

"I'm very accustomed to working in a bipartisan way — that's what I had to do to get things done in Mississippi, and at the end of the day, what you're paid for is getting things done."