The three-term senator, who cited extreme partisanship when announcing she wouldn’t seek reelection last year, said, "We are a representative democracy, and we get the government we demand, and if we value and insist on bipartisanship, we will get it." 

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She added, "I want people to know their voices do make a difference."

When asked by The Hill which lawmakers she would consider examples of politicians who embody a commitment to bipartisanship, she named Maine Sens. Susan CollinsSusan CollinsSchumer: Senate Russia probe moving too slowly Collins: I'm not working with Freedom Caucus chairman on healthcare Mexico: Recent deportations 'a violation' of US immigration rules MORE (R) and Angus KingAngus KingSenator: No signs of GOP 'slow-walking' Russia investigation Republican Sen. Collins considering run for Maine governor in 2018 Conway: Dems should listen to their constituents on tax reform MORE (I), as well as Mark WarnerMark WarnerSchumer: Senate Russia probe moving too slowly Senate Intel Dem has ‘serious concerns’ on Russia probe GOP senator hits back at criticism of Russia probe MORE (D-Va.), and Lisa MurkowskiLisa MurkowskiTrump’s Army pick faces tough confirmation fight Republican Sen. Collins considering run for Maine governor in 2018 Alaska senators push bill to allow Arctic drilling MORE (R-Alaska).

A bevy of former Capitol regulars were eyed at the book party, including former Sens. Trent Lott (R-Miss.), Byron Dorgan (D-N.D.), Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.), and former Reps. Connie Morella (R-Md.) and Mike Castle (R-Del.).  

"We have a lot of former members and some current members who believe that compromise is not a bad word — it is in fact how things get done," Morella told The Hill.  Morella is now the President of the Association of Former Members of Congress. Snowe sits on the board of the association.

Former Mississippi Gov. and Republican National Committee (RNC) Chair Haley Barbour was also spotted at the event. Barbour co-chairs the Bipartisan Policy Center's Immigration Task Force.  

"The eight years I was governor of Mississippi, we had a Democratic majority in the House every day, a Democratic majority in the Senate seven years out of eight — to pass anything I had to get Democratic votes," said Barbour.  

"I'm very accustomed to working in a bipartisan way — that's what I had to do to get things done in Mississippi, and at the end of the day, what you're paid for is getting things done."