Sive knows a thing or two about campaign strategy — she worked as an adviser and fundraiser for a slew of former and current Democratic lawmakers, including former vice presidential candidate and Rep. Geraldine Ferraro (N.Y.), Sens. Barbara MikulskiBarbara MikulskiClinton: White House slow-walking Russia sanctions Top Lobbyists 2017: Hired Guns Gore wishes Mikulski a happy birthday at 'Inconvenient Sequel' premiere MORE (Md.), Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowSupreme Court weighs Congress's power to dismiss lawsuits We must fund community health centers now Overnight Energy: Perry takes heat for sexual assault comments | Clovis withdraws nomination for USDA post | Battle lines drawn on Arctic refuge drilling | Energy regulator back to full strength MORE (Mich.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharReported pressure on CNN in Time Warner merger raises retaliation fears Dem sens demand answers over reports DOJ wanted CNN sold Ted Cruz, Debbie Dingell help Chuck Todd celebrate 70 years of 'Meet the Press' MORE (Minn.), as well as Landrieu.

ADVERTISEMENT
The author says while research has shown there are many obstacles that may make it harder for women to seek public office, she contends, “because there’s a mountain to climb, there’s no reason not to climb that mountain, because you’re going to make a difference when you get there.”

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt, the granddaughter of former President Franklin Roosevelt and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt, wrote the foreword to the book. The president and CEO of Goodwill Industries of Northern New England tells ITK, “I want women to take away from this [book] that we can’t sit back and assume that it’s going to be somebody else that does it. Each of us can learn lessons about how to look at every day as part of an important process called politics and elections that we can each participate in in some way.”

Roosevelt, who chuckles she might have felt some “self-manufactured” pressure in the past to run for office due to her famous last name, says she feels there are many roles in the electoral process that women can pursue. “I thought my skills and talents were more productive in support roles,” she says. “The important point is: get in there.”

Sive stresses Every Day is Election Day — which hits store shelves Thursday — is strictly nonpartisan. “They’re not party bound, or office bound, or issue bound,” she says of the book’s tips. “I think these are lessons that are really instructive for women regardless of party.”