Budweiser has released an ad that will air during this Sunday's 2017 Super Bowl that nods to the heated debate over immigration.

The television commercial shows the dramatized journey of a German man that results in the creation of the Anheuser-Busch InBev (ABI) company that owns the Budweiser beer brand.

“You don’t look like you’re from around here,” a man tells Adolphus Busch as the 60-second ad opens.

“Why leave Germany?” a doctor asks Busch in German, while stitching a cut on the future beer brewer’s head.

“I want to brew beer,” Busch responds in English.

Busch next arrives in America, where the newcomer is treated with suspicion and hostility from locals.

“You’re not welcome here,” one man says, bumping into him.

“Go back home,” another orders.

The spot, which was released Tuesday, ends with Busch arriving in St. Louis, meeting Ebert Anheuser and bonding with him over a beer.

“A beer for my friend,” Anheuser says, purchasing the beverage for Busch, who seems surprised by the gesture.

“Next time, this is the beer we drink,” Busch responds, showing his future partner a sketch of his beer brewing ideas.

“When nothing stops your dream,” the ad’s text concludes over an Anheuser-Busch logo. "This is the beer we drink.”

Budweiser’s dramatic commercial has amassed 2,525,260 views and counting since debuting Tuesday.

The clip will air on television during the Super Bowl this Sunday between the Atlanta Falcons and the New England Patriots.

The New York Times reported on Jan. 29 that the average cost of a 30-second spot during the hotly anticipated football contest is $5 million this year.

Immigration is at the forefront of the national debate following President TrumpDonald John TrumpAccuser says Trump should be afraid of the truth Woman behind pro-Trump Facebook page denies being influenced by Russians Shulkin says he has White House approval to root out 'subversion' at VA MORE’s executive order last Friday that imposes a 90-day ban on travelers from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Syria, Sudan and Yemen entering the U.S. 

The measure also froze general refugee admissions into the U.S. for 120 days, with an indefinite pause on entrance of Syrian refugees.

Democrats and human rights groups have fiercely hammered Trump’s decision, arguing it is unconstitutional and biased against Muslims.

Trump has countered the seven Muslim-majority countries impacted were selected because of their risk for radical Islamic terrorism.