Ruth Bader Ginsburg appeared to erroneously dub Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamGraham: Trump's Charlottesville rhetoric 'dividing Americans, not healing them' OPINION: Congress should censure Trump for his unfit conduct Supporting 'Dreamers' is our civic and moral duty MORE (R-S.C.) one of the "women of the Senate" this week.

The 84-year-old Supreme Court justice delivered remarks at Allegheny College in Pennsylvania on Monday as she accepted the Prize for Civility in Public Life, honoring her and late Justice Antonin Scalia.

“Let’s hope members of Congress, the members Allegheny College has already honored — Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenMoore, Strange advance in Alabama GOP primary Alabama GOP Senate primary: live results White House clarifies: We condemn all violence MORE and Sen. John McCainJohn McCainBush biographer: Trump has moved the goalpost for civilized society White House to pressure McConnell on ObamaCare McCain: Trump needs to state difference between bigots and those fighting hate MORE [R-Ariz.], the women of the Senate, Sens. Dianne FeinsteinDianne FeinsteinTrump's Democratic tax dilemma Feinstein: Trump immigration policies 'cruel and arbitrary' The Memo: Could Trump’s hard line work on North Korea? MORE [D-Calif.] and Lindsey Graham — let’s hope that they and others of goodwill will lead in restoring harmonious work ways,” Ginsburg said during her acceptance speech.

However, a spokesman representing Allegheny College told Washington Examiner that Ginsburg wasn't referring to Graham as one of the "women of the Senate."

The spokesman said Ginsburg was instead referring to Graham and Feinstein as winners of the college's Prize for Civility in Public Life in 2013, and the same prize being awarded in 2014 to the "Women of the Senate," a reference to 20 senators who "banded together to help end the 2013 government shutdown."

Graham’s office didn’t return ITK’s request for comment about the apparent gender-swapping snafu involving the 61-year-old senator.

This report was updated at 8:35 p.m.