Tom Petty dies at 66
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Rock star Tom Petty — whose music was coveted by politicians for their campaign events — has died at 66.

The Heartbreakers frontman died Monday after going into cardiac arrest a day earlier, his manager confirmed in a statement to news outlets.

The legendary rocker was known for a countless string of hits, including “Refugee,” “Don’t Come Around Here No More,” "Free Fallin' " and “Runnin’ Down a Dream,” among many others.

His catalogue of songs proved popular in the political world, with more than one candidate playing some of Petty’s hits to rev up the crowd on the campaign trail.

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In 2000, Petty’s music publisher made headlines after requesting that then-GOP presidential candidate George W. Bush’s campaign stop using “I Won’t Back Down” at rallies.

“Please be advised that this use has not been approved. … Any use made by you or your campaign creates, either intentionally or unintentionally, the impression that you and your campaign have been endorsed by Tom Petty, which is not true,” Wixen Music Publishing president Randall Wixen wrote to the Bush camp, according to Rolling Stone.

Former Rep. Michele BachmannMichele Marie BachmannJuan Williams: The GOP has divided America Bachmann praises Trump as man of faith Tom Petty dies at 66 MORE’s (R-Minn.) campaign encountered a similar circumstance with the Florida-born musician in 2011, when Petty’s team sent a cease and desist letter to the lawmaker for playing “American Girl” at a rally.

Petty allowed then-Democratic presidential candidate Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGrassley blasts Democrats over unwillingness to probe Clinton GOP lawmakers cite new allegations of political bias in FBI Top intel Dem: Trump Jr. refused to answer questions about Trump Tower discussions with father MORE to use the same song during her 2008 White House bid.

Petty had a different reaction when “I Won’t Back Down” was played in 2012 as then-President Obama took to the stage at the Democratic National Convention.

“I got chills,” Petty told Rolling Stone at the time. “They knew it would be okay. I’ve had a chance to meet the president talk to him about the music he listens to.”

Earlier Monday reports of Petty's death from CBS News were amended after the Los Angeles Police Department denied it had confirmed the news.

Petty had recently wrapped up a tour when he died. He had said in a December interview ahead of the concerts: “I'd be lying if I didn't say I was thinking this might be the last big one. We're all on the backside of our sixties. I have a granddaughter now I'd like to see as much as I can. I don't want to spend my life on the road.”