Woody Allen calls Weinstein reports 'tragic,' warns of 'witch hunt'
© Getty Images

 

Famed filmmaker Woody Allen said in a new interview that the Harvey Weinstein allegations were "tragic," while also warning of a potential "witch hunt atmosphere" as a result of the controversy.

"The whole Harvey Weinstein thing is very sad for everybody involved," Allen told the BBC in an interview on Sunday. "Tragic for the poor women that were involved, sad for Harvey that [his] life is so messed up."

ADVERTISEMENT
"There's no winners in that, it's just very, very sad and tragic for those poor women that had to go through that," he continued.

Allen said women should speak up to help address the issue, while warning that the Weinstein scandal shouldn't lead to a "witch hunt atmosphere, a Salem atmosphere, where every guy in an office who winks at a woman is suddenly having to call a lawyer to defend himself. That's not right, either."

"But you do hear a million fanciful rumors all the time. And some turn out to be true and some — many — are just stories about this actress, or that actor," he added.

Allen also acknowledged that he had heard some of the rumors about Harvey's reputation, but was not aware of the accusations of rape and forced oral sex.

"No one ever came to me or told me horror stories with any real seriousness," he told the BBC.

Weinstein's spokesman said he "unequivocally" denies "any allegations of non-consensual sex."

Allen's son, Ronan Farrow, wrote the bombshell New Yorker story last week in which three women claimed Weinstein raped them, while many accused him of assault and harassment.

Farrow has also taken aim at his father for “his inappropriate conduct with children,” after Allen's adopted daughter reported he had sexually assaulted her. A spokesperson for Allen at the time called allegations "untrue and disgraceful."

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences also ousted Weinstein last week amid the allegations.

In his first public appearance since news of the allegations broke, Weinstein told reporters last week that "we all make mistakes" and that he was seeking help.