Princip triggered the unraveling of what in William Butler Yeats's day was referred to as “Christendom.” Yeats: “Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold ...” Now our own world-as-we-know-it could yield, and it has already begun to do so.

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As far as I can see from reports so far, Snowden’s was a clear, conscious act of libertarian civil disobedience, a focused and considered Jedi maneuver which hit dead center. And it was right out of the textbook that inspired Gandhi, Tolstoy, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Kentucky Sen. Rand PaulRand PaulTrump: 'No doubt' we'll make a deal on healthcare Overnight Defense: General says US strike probably led to civilian deaths | Tillerson to push NATO on spending | Trump taps F-35 chief Senate backs Montenegro's NATO membership MORE’s local champion, Cassius Clay (the fire-breathing Kentucky anti-slavery journalist, not the boxer): Henry David Thoreau’s classic essay, "Resistance to Civil Government," commonly referred to as “Civil Disobedience.”

The question which looms today is how will Snowden’s action play out in the Republican Party? Paul is reserving judgment on Snowden but is planning a civil lawsuit against the federal government over the vast collection of personal data.

Libertarian Paul could now well rise to dominance. And that is the question: Whose party will it be come this time next year, Rand Paul’s or South Carolina Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamOvernight Finance: Senate Dems call for investigation of acting SEC chairman | Wyden: Russia probe should focus on Trump financial ties | Dems seek more money for IRS Overnight Defense: Pentagon considers more troops for Afghanistan | McCain, Graham won't back short-term funding | GOP defends Trump rules of engagement McCain and Graham: We won't back short-term government funding bill MORE’s? Look to the speeches this weekend at the Faith and Freedom Coalition’s “Road to Majority” conference in Washington, D.C. Paul will speak. So will Sarah Palin and Texas Sen. Ted CruzTed CruzTexas Dem targets Sen. Ted Cruz in 2018 What are 'religious liberty' bills really about? Fiorina calls for special prosecutor for Russia probe MORE. And this, in the wake of Snowden's actions, could be a definitive moment.

That moment could decide America’s future because of two things: one, conservatives have entered into a new generation, a season of growth and positive change; and two, this movement is quickly rising into its creative arc, the moment of fire awakened, the place of no return. Whoever wins the conservative’s hearts and minds at the Faith and Freedom conference could well take the initiative into 2016.

And that person will challenge Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonBudowsky: Putin’s KGB super PAC April Ryan: 'I was in shock' Is America's military effort in the Middle East constitutional? MORE for president in 2016. There can be none other than Hillary. There is no one left. If it is Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, Sarah Palin or Texas Gov. Rick Perry, conservatives will win in 2016 and remain in power for more than a decade. If it is an Eastern establishment regular — New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie comes first to mind (or Florida Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioRepublicans giving Univision the cold shoulder: report Week ahead: Senate panel to vote on Trump's Labor pick Senators introduce new Iran sanctions MORE, the Cuban Jeb Bush) — then it doesn’t matter who wins.