Princip triggered the unraveling of what in William Butler Yeats's day was referred to as “Christendom.” Yeats: “Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold ...” Now our own world-as-we-know-it could yield, and it has already begun to do so.

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As far as I can see from reports so far, Snowden’s was a clear, conscious act of libertarian civil disobedience, a focused and considered Jedi maneuver which hit dead center. And it was right out of the textbook that inspired Gandhi, Tolstoy, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Kentucky Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP Senate primary heats up in Montana Sarah Sanders: ‘Democrats are losing their war against women in the Trump administration’ Kentucky Dems look to vault themselves in deep-red district MORE’s local champion, Cassius Clay (the fire-breathing Kentucky anti-slavery journalist, not the boxer): Henry David Thoreau’s classic essay, "Resistance to Civil Government," commonly referred to as “Civil Disobedience.”

The question which looms today is how will Snowden’s action play out in the Republican Party? Paul is reserving judgment on Snowden but is planning a civil lawsuit against the federal government over the vast collection of personal data.

Libertarian Paul could now well rise to dominance. And that is the question: Whose party will it be come this time next year, Rand Paul’s or South Carolina Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSenate GOP urges Trump administration to work closely with Congress on NAFTA Graham: Trump will 'end North Korea’s threat to the American homeland' in his first term Sunday shows preview: Lawmakers weigh in after Texas school shooting MORE’s? Look to the speeches this weekend at the Faith and Freedom Coalition’s “Road to Majority” conference in Washington, D.C. Paul will speak. So will Sarah Palin and Texas Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzPoll: Cruz leads O'Rourke by 7 points Freedom Caucus bruised but unbowed in GOP primary fights Five races to watch in the Texas runoffs MORE. And this, in the wake of Snowden's actions, could be a definitive moment.

That moment could decide America’s future because of two things: one, conservatives have entered into a new generation, a season of growth and positive change; and two, this movement is quickly rising into its creative arc, the moment of fire awakened, the place of no return. Whoever wins the conservative’s hearts and minds at the Faith and Freedom conference could well take the initiative into 2016.

And that person will challenge Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDem targeted by party establishment loses Texas primary Penn to Hewitt: Mueller probe born out of ‘hysteria’ Trump claims a 'spy' on his campaign tried to help 'Crooked Hillary' win MORE for president in 2016. There can be none other than Hillary. There is no one left. If it is Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, Sarah Palin or Texas Gov. Rick Perry, conservatives will win in 2016 and remain in power for more than a decade. If it is an Eastern establishment regular — New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie comes first to mind (or Florida Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRepublicans think Trump is losing trade war The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — Trump meets South Korean leader as questions linger about summit with North Senators demand answers on Trump’s ZTE deal MORE, the Cuban Jeb Bush) — then it doesn’t matter who wins.