Princip triggered the unraveling of what in William Butler Yeats's day was referred to as “Christendom.” Yeats: “Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold ...” Now our own world-as-we-know-it could yield, and it has already begun to do so.

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As far as I can see from reports so far, Snowden’s was a clear, conscious act of libertarian civil disobedience, a focused and considered Jedi maneuver which hit dead center. And it was right out of the textbook that inspired Gandhi, Tolstoy, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Kentucky Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP senator asks to be taken off Moore fundraising appeals Red state lawmakers find blue state piggy bank Prosecutors tell Paul to expect federal charges against attacker: report MORE’s local champion, Cassius Clay (the fire-breathing Kentucky anti-slavery journalist, not the boxer): Henry David Thoreau’s classic essay, "Resistance to Civil Government," commonly referred to as “Civil Disobedience.”

The question which looms today is how will Snowden’s action play out in the Republican Party? Paul is reserving judgment on Snowden but is planning a civil lawsuit against the federal government over the vast collection of personal data.

Libertarian Paul could now well rise to dominance. And that is the question: Whose party will it be come this time next year, Rand Paul’s or South Carolina Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamCNN to air sexual harassment Town Hall featuring Gretchen Carlson, Anita Hill Trump wrestles with handling American enemy combatants Flake: Trump's call for DOJ to probe Democrats 'not normal' MORE’s? Look to the speeches this weekend at the Faith and Freedom Coalition’s “Road to Majority” conference in Washington, D.C. Paul will speak. So will Sarah Palin and Texas Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Finance: GOP criticism of tax bill grows, but few no votes | Highlights from day two of markup | House votes to overturn joint-employer rule | Senate panel approves North Korean banking sanctions GOP criticism of tax bill grows, but few ready to vote against it Anti-gay marriage county clerk Kim Davis to seek reelection in Kentucky MORE. And this, in the wake of Snowden's actions, could be a definitive moment.

That moment could decide America’s future because of two things: one, conservatives have entered into a new generation, a season of growth and positive change; and two, this movement is quickly rising into its creative arc, the moment of fire awakened, the place of no return. Whoever wins the conservative’s hearts and minds at the Faith and Freedom conference could well take the initiative into 2016.

And that person will challenge Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGOP rushes to cut ties to Moore Papadopoulos was in regular contact with Stephen Miller, helped edit Trump speech: report Bannon jokes Clinton got her ‘ass kicked’ in 2016 election MORE for president in 2016. There can be none other than Hillary. There is no one left. If it is Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, Sarah Palin or Texas Gov. Rick Perry, conservatives will win in 2016 and remain in power for more than a decade. If it is an Eastern establishment regular — New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie comes first to mind (or Florida Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Cybersecurity: What we learned from Carter Page's House Intel testimony | House to mark up foreign intel reform law | FBI can't access Texas shooter's phone | Sessions to testify at hearing amid Russia scrutiny Cornyn: Senate GOP tax plan to be released Thursday This week: GOP seeks to advance tax overhaul MORE, the Cuban Jeb Bush) — then it doesn’t matter who wins.