Christie is most notably not on the list of GOP speakers at the Faith and Freedom Conference taking place in Washington, D.C. Sens. Marco RubioMarco RubioMexican politicians have a new piñata: Donald Trump Bush ethics lawyer: Congress must tell Trump not to fire Mueller The private alternative to the National Flood Insurance Program  MORE (Fla.) and Rand PaulRand PaulMcConnell to pin down colleagues on healthcare Unhappy senators complain about healthcare process Judd Gregg: For Trump, reaching out would pay off MORE (Ky.) — both potential 2016 presidential candidates — are addressing the conservative gathering, one of the important stops along the way to wooing primary voters ahead of a White House campaign.

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Neither confab included Christie. Everybody remembers how Christie praised President Obama last fall after his visit to the Garden State, ravaged by Hurricane Sandy, just weeks before his reelection. Conservatives will remember it far longer: Christie is now persona non grata among some donors and activists in the GOP. 

Meanwhile Christie's hanging with the Big Dog instead for a presentation called "Cooperation and Collaboration: A Conversation on Leadership." Clinton is arguably not only the most popular political figure in the United States but one with high approval from Republicans as well as Democrats. Though Clinton campaigned against Christie in 2009 on behalf of former Gov. Jon Corzine (D), he made an effort to reach out to Christie, and they have been friendly ever since.

According to an ABC News story, Clinton and Christie aides described them as similar in upbringing and perspective, and said that both are likable and command a room. Interestingly a Christie source is quoted saying: "This is a stature thing. It burnishes his bipartisan credentials and it shows the governor is a serious guy. He's talking about leadership with Clinton. That's a big deal."  

It's real nice and all, but after Christie most likely gets reelected this fall in a blue state — and most likely by a wide margin — how does he get through the GOP presidential primary as the buddy of Presidents Barack ObamaBarack ObamaDem senator: Trump's 'icky' Boy Scout speech left 'my stomach in knots' Boos for Obama as Trump speaks at Boy Scout jamboree Feehery: Winning August MORE and Bill ClintonBill ClintonBoos for Obama as Trump speaks at Boy Scout jamboree Feehery: Winning August OPINION | Dems need a fresh face for 2020: Try Kamala Harris MORE? And clearly Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonManafort to share notes from Russian meeting with Senate probe: report Scarborough to Trump: Switch cable news to ‘SportsCenter’ Ex-Bush ethics lawyer: Trump calling for Clinton to be prosecuted is an ‘impeachable offense’
 MORE, if running in 2016, would never want to face Christie, now popular with Democrats as well as independents, in the general election. 

Is Clinton playing Christie? Or through the years of a maturing friendship can he talk Christie into leaving the GOP and running as Hillary's VP?

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