Immigration's Bipartisan Ouster

Did anyone hear the whooping, hooting, and hollering coming from Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonWATCH LIVE: Trump holds rally in Michigan Stars come out for Clinton fundraiser Chicago Sun-Times: Vote Clinton, 'avert a train wreck' MORE's campaign headquarters last Thursday when the immigration reform bill failed a procedural vote in the Senate? Sure, Clinton voted to proceed with the controversial compromise, but she couldn't have been happier to watch it die.

According to a Gallop poll released last week, Clinton now stands to benefit the most from the backlash against the Republicans and President Bush among Hispanic voters. The findings show that, by a nearly 3-1 margin, Hispanic voters are identifying themselves as Democrats or leaning Democratic — and the immigration debate is a major factor. Clinton can now appeal to this critical voting bloc but won't be dogged by a vote for final passage of an amnesty package for illegals, a bill so unpopular that protesting voters managed to jam the Senate phone system with their calls. 

As the Democrats take to the trail next year to castigate Republicans for the Iraq war, damage to the environment, the politicization of the Department of Justice, secrecy in the executive branch, raging deficits, and everything else wrong in America, rest assured they will start blaming the GOP for killing immigration reform. But killing immigration reform was the only true act of bipartisanship to have come out of Congress in a long time.

Was anyone in the chamber chuckling last Friday when Sen. Charles SchumerCharles SchumerElection-year politics: Senate Dems shun GOP vulnerables Democrats press Wells Fargo CEO for more answers on scandal 78 lawmakers vote to sustain Obama veto MORE (D-N.Y.) said on the Senate floor that Thursday was "a very sad day for America ... an ideological, extreme group set back our country. On immigration we had lots of prattling, lots of scare tactics, and, as a result, the immigration bill is paralyzed." Schumer didn't mention that the following "ideological, extreme" Democratic senators voted to kill the bill: Max BaucusMax BaucusChina moves to lift ban on US beef Overnight Healthcare: Zika fight stalls government funding talks | Census finds big drop in uninsured | Mental health bill faces wait Glover Park Group now lobbying for Lyft MORE and Jon TesterJon TesterElection-year politics: Senate Dems shun GOP vulnerables Democrats press Wells Fargo CEO for more answers on scandal Overnight Finance: Senate rejects funding bill as shutdown looms | Labor Dept. to probe Wells Fargo | Fed to ease stress test rules for small banks MORE of Montana, Robert Byrd and Jay RockefellerJay RockefellerLobbying world Overnight Tech: Senators place holds on FCC commissioner Overnight Tech: Senate panel to vote on Dem FCC commissioner MORE of West Virginia, Jim Webb of Virginia, Evan Bayh of Indiana, Tom HarkinTom HarkinGrassley challenger no stranger to defying odds Clinton ally stands between Sanders and chairmanship dream Do candidates care about our health or just how much it costs? MORE of Iowa, David Pryor of Arkansas, Debbie StabenowDebbie StabenowMichigan Dems highlight Flint with unanimous opposition to CR How Congress averted shutdown Senate passes funding bill to avoid shutdown MORE of Michigan, Byron Dorgan of North Dakota, Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuLouisiana needs Caroline Fayard as its new senator La. Senate contender books seven-figure ad buy Crowded field muddies polling in Louisiana Senate race MORE of Louisiana, Sherrod BrownSherrod BrownOvernight Finance: Lawmakers float criminal charges for Wells Fargo chief | Scrutiny on Trump's Cuba dealings | Ryan warns of recession if no tax reform Anti-trade senators say chamber would be crazy to pass TPP Democrats press Wells Fargo CEO for more answers on scandal MORE of Ohio, Jeff Bingaman of New Mexico and Claire McCaskillClaire McCaskillClinton campaign chair jabs at Trump's age Election-year politics: Senate Dems shun GOP vulnerables The Trail 2016: Miss Universe crashes campaign MORE of Missouri. A radical bunch indeed, representing voters who hated the bill.