The Wine and Cheese Occupation

On Tuesday afternoon, peace advocates descended on the Longworth office of Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) and said they plan to remain there until they are forced from the building. He is not the first Democrat to be stalked by anti-war protestors, and he won’t be the last. But something about them camping out at the office of Van Hollen, who just lost his mother and is charged as head of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee with keeping his party in power in Congress in the next election, seemed particularly ironic. The crowd, no surprise, opposes his plan to support the supplemental Iraq war funding bill coming up for a vote this week.

Outside of the Bay Area home of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in San Francisco, the protestors have been waiting patiently for “a dialogue,” and one explained on the Tucker show this week on MSNBC that they play music and serve wine and cheese. Tucker asked that they never hold a wine and cheese party on his lawn -- not exactly something Pelosi and Van Hollen could request, of course.

I admire the tenacity of the anti-war crowd, and respect their right to aggressively pursue their goal to end the Iraq war. But as the Democratic leadership has told the anti-war membership in the caucus, this supplemental bill that includes a deadline for withdrawal is as far as the party can go, and it is the best the peace advocates will get. If it goes down, Pelosi has warned them, she will pass a clean funding bill for President Bush’s signature. If she ultimately wins over Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.), the chairwoman of the Out of Iraq Caucus who has remained publicly undecided or without comment on the vote, can Ms. Waters count on the wine and cheese occupation as well?

More in Senate

Dems on ObamaCare: Was it worth it?

Read more »