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That said, things look awfully different and difficult in the GOP-controlled House. Proponents of reform, like House Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerIt's time for McConnell to fight with Trump instead of against him How Republicans can bring order out of the GOP's chaos Republican donor sues GOP for fraud over ObamaCare repeal failure MORE (R-Ohio) and Rep. Paul RyanPaul RyanGOP chairman to discuss Charlottesville as domestic terrorism at hearing Trump’s isolation grows GOP lawmaker: Trump 'failing' in Charlottesville response MORE (R-Wis.), have done enough talking and listening with their conservative colleagues to know the Senate bill just won't fly. And bringing a conference report to the floor that largely reflects the main provisions of the Senate legislation is a nonstarter, to say the least.

John BoehnerJohn BoehnerIt's time for McConnell to fight with Trump instead of against him How Republicans can bring order out of the GOP's chaos Republican donor sues GOP for fraud over ObamaCare repeal failure MORE held a press conference after Senate passage to reiterate his intention to bring a bill to the floor only that is supported by a "majority of the majority," something he had said weeks before but that worried conservatives who noted he had refused to apply the same mandate to a conference report when asked specifically by a reporter.

Conventional wisdom holds that opposition to reform is based solely upon the need to secure the border first and to provide legal citizenship later. But legalization itself — forgiveness for law breaking — is still a primary complaint of the conservative groups congressional Republicans hear from the most. 

House Republicans say they can't pass a path to citizenship. So the piecemeal approach favored by most of the House GOP conference means the House will pass immigration reform, but a law seems unlikely.

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WILL STUDENT LOAN RATES DOUBLE? AskAB is off for the July 4 week and returns Monday July 8. Please join my weekly video Q&A by sending your questions and comments to askab@thehill.com. Thank you.