Who lost Egypt? The secretary of State must go

Who lost Egypt?

This week, soccer goons tore down walls surrounding the Israeli Embassy in Egypt, but Hillary opened the gate. Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul (R) calls for a no-confidence vote against Tim Geithner. Forget Geithner. History will deal with him. The House and Senate should call for a no-confidence resolution against Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the entire ludicrous and incompetent foreign policy establishment.

“Egypt is not going toward democracy, but toward Islamicization,” Eli Shaked, a former Israeli ambassador to Cairo, told The New York Times. “It is the same in Turkey and in Gaza. It is just like what happened in Iran in 1979.”

Alec Ross, Hillary Clinton's senior adviser for innovation at the U.S. State Department, has lauded the way the Internet has become "the Che Guevara of the 21st century" in the Arab Spring uprisings. Meaning that’s a good thing. The Che reference more than anything reveals the undergraduate coffee shop geist of these foreign policy innocents. The U.S. has pledged to back the “pro-democracy movement” that swept the Middle East and North Africa since January, Ross said, as disaffected citizens organize influential protest movements on Facebook and Twitter, The Guardian, U.K., reported on June 22, 2011.

Strange but true, we heard very similar rhapsodies about the new microcassette technology pioneered in the 1970s as a miraculous revolutionary talisman from liberal supporters of the Ayatollah Khomeini. It made his anti-American and anti-Israeli rants mobile. But now soccer goons have joined the melee.

The Arab Spring was to be a nerd paradise, a Silicon Valley for Arab yuppies. At a recent debate at the National Press Club, Peter Bergen, CNN’s Hillaryland correspondent, said: When you look at the Arab spring, “not a single picture of Osama bin Laden, not a single American flag burning, not a single Israeli flag burning ... ”

Not exactly true, responded Daveed Gartenstein-Ross, author of the recently released Bin Laden’s Legacy: Why We’re Still Losing the War on Terror.

“Historically, when you have sky-high expectations that go unfulfilled, as you may have with the Arab Spring, extreme ideologies can step in and fill in the void,” he responded. “We may well see that.”

Astonishingly prescient, as this debate took place on Sept. 1. Nine days later, The New York Times reports that soccer fans, thugs known in Egypt as “ultras,” are tearing down the Israeli Embassy in Cairo and dumping documents out of the windows. The Israeli ambassador, Yitzhak Levanon, his family and most of the staff and their dependents — some 80 people — were evacuated out of the country by military aircraft overnight, the Egypt Daily News reports.

“Long known for their obscene chants and reckless brawls, the ultras have become increasingly engaged in politics since the revolution,” the Times reports.

In fact, Egypt's soccer goons have been an essential part of the uprising from the beginning, with thousands shouting and chanting things like "F--k the mother of Hosni Mubarak!" and "Go f--k your Minister, Habib al Adly!" It was a sympathetic MSM which conspired to create the obsequious "Arab Spring" when the situation on the ground often suggested Brownshirts and "Springtime for Hitler.”