A new kind of warfare

A story that should certainly have your immediate attention is slowly developing in Iran. Over the past several months five Iranian nuclear scientist have been assassinated, the latest one being yesterday, when two motorcyclists attached a magnetic bomb to a car fender and rode away while detonating the device.

No one has claimed responsibility, and the Iranian government is accusing Israel and the United States of the assassinations (in which both vehemently denied any involvement).

If, in fact, we are involved, it might be a much easier way to stop the nation’s nuclear program than war. This could actually bring Iran’s nuclear development to a halt, or at least drive it underground, which would slow its progress significantly.

Whoever is the mastermind behind these deadly attacks must have excellent intelligence in order to be successful without the hint of a trace. Many of these Iranian scientists — with good reason — are fearful for their well-being, and more importantly, their lives. Fear of death for many Iranian scientists is a good motivator in forcing them to rethink the repercussions of their deadly actions.

While this might seem barbaric, it is not nearly as bad as inflicting the thousands of casualties associated with war. Will this be a game-changer in Iran's determination to develop an arsenal of nuclear weaponry?