Dems find courage, conviction and common sense in Dennis Kucinich

Kucinich’s anti-war resolution might be the moment on which the Democrats can regroup and even begin again. Last Wednesday, Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio) made the following statement after his resolution, H. Con. Res. 51, to end the war in Libya was pulled from the floor calendar and postponed:

“I am disappointed that the president and leadership feel the need to buy even more time to shore up support for the war in Libya. It’s not surprising that some are now wondering if a preliminary vote count on my resolution came out in favor of defending the Constitution.”

Been a long time coming. A turning seemed to be ahead five years ago when Markos Moulitsas, founder of Daily Kos and a commentator at The Hill, talked of a new generation rising in the Democratic Party with former governor, now Virginia senator, Mark Warner and Virginia Sen. Jim Webb. But conservatives stole the agrarian fire.

Problem was the Clintons, said Kos. “[T]he New York senator is part of a failed Democratic Party establishment — led by her husband — that enabled the George W. Bush presidency and the Republican majorities, and all the havoc they have wreaked at home and abroad,” he wrote in The Washington Post on May 7, 2006.

Will these Clinton-era Democrats never go away? asked Kos on his famous blog.

Apparently not. One appears now to be secretary of State. And I don’t see that Obama has brought the cure to awaken a new liberal strategy and culture. He is an adult. He completes the Kennedy age. But he seems a one-night stand and, like the Clintons, a parlor liberal, more suited to the blithe sensibilities of the summer crowd at Martha’s Vineyard than to Sarah Palin’s mighty bunch of farmers, fishermen, veterans, bikers, preachers, rednecks, guys named Darryl and Ted Nugent.

And this: The president does not have power under the Constitution to unilaterally authorize a military attack in a situation that does not involve stopping an actual or imminent threat to the nation.Barack Obama, Dec. 20, 2007.

Meet the new boss. Same as the old boss.

Kucinich’s anti-war resolution on Libya is a repudiation of the current Democratic leadership and direction.

During the war on Iraq, Moulitsas was a big supporter of Howard Dean’s anti-war position. I felt that was a mistake: It went to the marginal in a time of crisis. But Moulitsas once mentioned that he first supported Clark. Gen. Wesley Clark had the better ideas about the invasion of Iraq.

Clark was right again this spring in regard to Libya. And like Kucinich, he went again in opposition to the main thrust the Democratic leadership would take. Libya didn’t meet the test for U.S. intervention, Clark wrote in The Washington Post on March 11, 2011.

"[A]s Moammar Gadhafi looks vulnerable and Libya descends into violence,” wrote Clark, “familiar voices are shouting, once again: ‘Quick, intervene, do something!’ It could be a low-cost win for democracy in the region. But before we aid the Libyan rebels or establish a no-fly zone, let's review what we've learned about intervening since we pulled out of Vietnam.”

With the impending irrelevance of both Anthony “Sticky Fingers” Weiner (Google it) and John Edwards, North and South aspects of Clinton/Obama-era salon liberalism might be descending. Clinton/Obama seems today the party of the very rich and fashionable, and this is what has brought wind to the sails of Sarah Palin and the Tea Party.

Kucinich brings the opportunity to start from scratch, back home with the people.