Queen Hillary, King Jeb: America’s descent into monarchy, Part 2

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Having the distinguished political god king marry you, for instance, has the same effect. As I recall, Jefferson left that stuff up to the rabbis and preachers. Anthony Weiner was conspicuously married by Bill Clinton, which suggests that the Clinton cult was more than a “family” or even a fraternal bonding of friends (like the mafia), it is a kind of secular religion, i.e., a family cult, and Bill is the priest. (But will Bill perform the bris?)

This, in our time, represents de facto descent into monarchy and political cultism. It is the same with those Republicans who can think only of Jeb (and Chris Christie, the family pet solicited by Barbara Bush, other Bushes and Kissinger against Romney). This is not something that is happening to America but has already happened. Those of us who do not want it should consider rationally our future of self-governance.

A constitutional convention has been suggested by a Virginia politician. More than 25 states signed on. But a constitutional convention is the wrong remedy because political sentiment has become regionalized in the past 30 years. For red states, where the family longings and political cultism is minimized, it would be like inviting England to the Constitutional Convention of 1787.

We have already seen in the last 10 years spontaneous and radical reaction to monarchist/imperial politics and federal dominance (i.e. Eastern establishment) by powerful individuals: Glenn Beck, Sarah Palin, Judge Andrew Napolitano, Ron Paul and a few others.

There has also been widespread spontaneous response, specifically since February 2009, when Paul Ingbretson and Dan Itse, two New Hampshire state legislators, proposed, citing Jefferson’s Kentucky Resolutions, that our state need not participate in ObamaCare if the law was unconstitutional.

More than 30 states immediately followed suit and the Tea Party was born. Today, more than 35 states ignore the federal government on issues of guns, abortion, ObamaCare, voting rights, immigration and other issues. These states tend to be more or less together and range from the South through Texas and the Southwest and well into the vast middle of the country.

These are also the states which are projected to prosper in decades ahead, while the Northeastern states — the old industrial region — descend into debt. It may not be a coincidence that it is these debt-ridden states which most prominently descend into de facto monarchy and family political cultism.

I have proposed here that these states, the states in the middle, meet in a Congress in a central place like Nashville of Louisville, Ky., for discussion — now rather than later.